Browsing Tag: boating safety

    Coast Guard Boating Safety   PSA   Travelogue
    Articles, Blog

    Coast Guard Boating Safety PSA Travelogue

    October 19, 2019


    [Guitar plays in background] (female narrator) It’s a place of uncommon beauty uncommon serenity uncommon solitude [engine noise in background] place where uncommon things can happen before you know it

    Families of missing teen boaters raise awareness for boating safety
    Articles, Blog

    Families of missing teen boaters raise awareness for boating safety

    October 19, 2019


    SANIKA: AS THE NEW YEAR KICKS OFF, THE AUSTIN BLU FOUNDATION IS LOOKING TO GET EVEN MORE INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY. THEY’VE ALREADY HAD TREMENDOUS SUCCESS HERE AT THE RIVER CENTER IN JUPITER AS THEY FUNDED BOATING SAFELY CLASSES IT’S A QUESTION CARLY BLACK AND BLU STEPHANOS HEAR OFTEN.>>EVERY DAY. SANIKA: REALLY?>>I DON’T KNOW, SHE’S MORE HUGGABLE THAN ME.>>AND I’M NOT, THAT’S THE SCARY THIN SANIKA: IT’S BEEN 18 MONTHS SINCE THEIR SON, AUSTIN, DISAPPEARED WHILE ON A FISHING TRIP WITH HIS FRIEND, PERRY COHEN.>>THEIR RESPONSE ISN’T, OH IT’S SO TERRIBLY FOR US. THEIR RESPONSE HAS BEEN, HOW CAN WE TURN THIS INTO A POSITIVE? SANIKA: BOTH THE AUSTIN B FOUNDATION AND THE PERRY J. COHEN FOUNDATION ARE NOW RAISING AWARENESS FOR SAFE BOATING, EVEN FUNDING BOATING SAFELY CLASSES>>IN 2015, WE TAUGHT ABOUT 60 STUDENTS. THAT’S JUST THIS FLOTILLA, AND WE WENT TO 370 IN 2016. SANIKA: NUMBERS THEY CREDIT WITH THE LEGACY LEFT BEHIND BY AUSTIN AND PERRY.>>IF I BRING THEM UP IN T CLASS, EVERYTHING QUIETS DOWN, STIL SANIKA: CLASSES ARE HELD ONCE A MONTH AT THE RIVER CENTER IN JUPITER. IT’S ONE OF THE ONLY PLACES LOCALLY WHERE YOU CAN GET YOUR BOATING SAFELY CARD AFTER JUST ONE EIGHT-HOUR DAY INSTEAD OF MULTIPLE SHORTER DAY>>MY DAUGHTER, WHO IS VERY EXPERIENCED, CAME HOME FROM THE BOATER SAFETY CLASS AND LISTED OFF THE THINGS THAT SHE HADN’T KNOWN BEFORE. SANIKA: BLU STEPHANOS, WHO’S ALREADY BEEN PUSHING FOR BOATER SAFETY LEGISLATION, IS HOPING TO FOCUS HIS ATTENTION ON THE BAHAMAS THIS YEA>>TRAVELING TO THE ISLANDS AND BEING PREPARED, YOU DO LOSE COMMUNICATION. BEING ABLE TO CORRELATE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE U.S. AND THE BAHAMA IT’S JUST A BETTER CHANCE FOR BOTH COUNTRIES TO WORK TOGETHE TO SAVE LIVES AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE. SANIKA: THAT LEGISLATION IS STILL IN ITS EARLY PHASES. IN THE MEANTIME, THESE ARE THE DATES OF UPCOMING BOATING SAFELY CLASSES FUNDED BY THE AUSTIN BLU FOUNDATION. AND HERE ARE THE DATES OF UPCOMING BOATING SAFELY CLASSES FUNDED BY THE PERRY J. COHEN FOUNDATION. THOUGH RECOMMENDED FOR AGES 12 AND UP, THE COAST GUARD SAYS THEY WELCOME ANY AGED CHILDREN MATURE ENOUGH FOR THE CLASS.

    Video: Boating and water safety tips
    Articles, Blog

    Video: Boating and water safety tips

    October 19, 2019


    TIMES, EVEN IF THEY ARE GOOD SWIMMERS. AND AS SUMMER INCHES CLOSER, WHILE EAGER TO GET OUT ON THE WATER, MAYBE YOU’RE EXCITED TO GET ON THE BOAT, JOINING THIS MORNING WITH MORE IMPORTANT INFORMATION, WES STRONG FROM BALTIMORE MARINE CENTERS. WE WERE JUST TALKING MEMORIAL DAY IS LITERALLY JUST INCHES AWAY AND I THINK EVERYBODY’S EITHER GETTING READY TO TAKE THEIR BOAT OUT OR THEY WANT TO GO OUT ON A BOAT. SAFETY IS ALWAYS FIRST. >>ABSOLUTELY, YEAH. >>SO YOU BROUGHT SOME THINGS TO SHOW US, VERY IMPORTANT THINGS. WHY DON’T WE START HERE.>>WE HAVE, THIS IS THE NEW — THIS JACKET IS REALLY POPULAR NOWADAYS. IT’S EASY TO CLIP ON. IT’S GOOD TO — EVERYBODY ON YOUR BOAT, SIZE IT AHEAD OF TIME. SO THEY KNOW WHAT FITS IN CASE OF EMERGENCY. IT WORKS. IT’S STANDARD SIZED, WORKS FOR ALMOST ALL ADULTS. THIS IS A NICE CHILD’S LIGHT JACKET, WHICH IS GOOD FOR THIS. IT’S MORE OF AN INFANT STYLE. WHAT’S NICE, YOU HAVE POSITIVE HEAD FLOTATION, GO IN THE WATER. IT HAS A BRACE THAT GOES BETWEEN THE LEGS. IN CASE A CHILD FALLS OVERBOARD, GRAB THE TOP. >>THIS MAY BE A SILLY QUESTION. DO LIFE JACKETS EXPIRE? ARE REALLY OLD ONES, ARE THEY STILL VALUABLE TO HAVE?>>THEY’RE BEST TO CHANGE OUT EVERY NOW AND THEN, CHECK THE WEBBING. THEY CAN GET DRY ROT, THINGS HAPPEN.>>THIS ONE LOOKS DIFFERENT. >>IT’S A NEWER STYLE, LIGHTWEIGHT, EASY TO WEAR ALL THE TIME. IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, YOU FALL IN THE WATER, IT WILL INFLATE OR SOME WILL AUTOMATICALLY INFLATE ONCE THEY SENSE TWAERT. >>WHAT TECHNOLOGY. >>IT’S GOOD TO HAVE A WHISTLE ON IT. AND THE FOUR-LEGGED FRIENDS, WE HAVE LIFE JACKETS FOR THE DOGS. >>VERY COOL. MOVING THIS DIRECTION?>>YOU HAVE TO HAVE A THROWABLE LIFE VEST, THROWABLE DEVICE ON BOARD THE BOAT AT ALL TIMES. TIE A ROPE TO IT. SOMEBODY FALLS IN THE WATER, THEY’RE AWAY FROM THE BOAT, TOSS IT, THEY CAN GRAB ON TO IT. >>THAT’S IMPORTANT BECAUSE YOU NEVER KNOW. >>ALL RIGHT. >>THIS IS ANOTHER THING THEY RECOMMEND PUTTING ON LIFE JACKETS. IT’S A SIGNALING DEVICE FOR BASICALLY A MIRROR. YOU SHINE IT TOWARDS THE SUN, AND IT HELPS THEM IDENTIFY WHERE YOU’RE AT. >>WHAT A GREAT IDEA. WHO WOULD THINK TO USE A MIRROR. SUCH A GOOD ONE. >>AN OLD ARMY, NAVY TRICK. >>FLARES, ANOTHER ONE. SHOW WHERE YOU ARE. >>YOU HAVE FLARES. THIS IS A NEW STYLE FLARE THEY HAVE. THE COAST GUARD HAS APPROVED FOR NIGHTTIME USE ONLY. WHAT’S GOOD ABOUT THIS IS THERE’S NO EXPIRATION DATE ON IT. JUST STRICTLY FOR NIGHTTIME USE. THEY GIVE A DISTRESS FLAG WITH IT YOU CAN USE FOR DAYTIME. THIS IS THE OLD STANDARD STYLE FLARE, WHICH YOU’LL SEE TRUCK DRIVERS HAVE PEOPLE HAVE ALONG THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. YOU IGNITE IT. IT SMOKES AND LIGHTS UP BUT THEY HAVE EXPIRATION DATES ON IT. >>ANOTHER NOISE MAKER. >>THE HORN. YOU HAVE ONE ON YOUR BOAT. YOU SHOULD HAVE AN EXTRA ONE ON.>>LASTLY, FIRST-AID KIT. >>PLEASE KEEP A FIRST-AID KIT ON THE BOAT. LITTLE THINGS, IF YOU’RE FISHING, SCRAPES, BUMPS, YOU’RE

    Cold Water Boating Safety
    Articles, Blog

    Cold Water Boating Safety

    October 19, 2019


    With the ice having just left
    many lakes in Minnesota, and barely clinging on
    in some others, it goes without saying the water will be
    dangerously cold for the start
    of the fishing season. That doesn’t mean fishermen
    will need to stay on shore, it just means they
    should be prepared. Each year in Minnesota more than 30 percent
    of boating fatalities occur in cold water with the victim
    not wearing a life jacket. Nobody expects to leave
    for day of fishing and never return. By planning ahead and taking
    a few simple safety steps you can put yourself
    in the best position possible to return home
    at the end of your trip. Wear a life jacket. If you ever fall overboard the life jacket sitting the boat
    won’t help. Not only does a life jacket
    keep your head above the water but it also gives you
    the opportunity to gain you composure
    and assess the situation. Without a life jacket even strong swimmers
    can drown within minutes. Trips and falls overboard are
    one of the most common factors in boating fatalities. Keep the floor of the boat
    free of clutter. From rods and reels
    to coolers and tackle boxes fishermen bring a
    lot of equipment in the boat with them. But if that stuff is strewn about
    it’s easy to trip over it and potentially fall overboard. Make it a habit
    to keep your equipment where you won’t be walking. Go fishing with a buddy. Statistics show that
    boating is safer the more people are involved. If it isn’t possible
    to go with anyone file a float plan and leave it
    with a responsible adult. That way, if a problem arises someone will know
    the details of your trip and can call for help. [♪]

    Articles

    For more boating tips visit https://www.clubmarine.com.au/exploreboating Man overboard

    October 15, 2019


    Steve Lague: It’s every skipper’s aim to ensure
    that all of their passengers have a great time every time they go out on the water. And they’ll go to great lengths to ensure
    that it happens. Steve Lague: But what would happen if one
    of your passengers fell overboard? Would you know what to do? Steve Lague: Doug, what are some of the precautions
    a skipper can take to prevent a man overboard incident? Doug King: I think prevention is definitely
    best, right up front. They should brief all of their passengers
    before they leave to head out. They should definitely have checked the weather
    to make sure it’s suitable for the size of their vessel and what they intend doing. It’s then up to the skipper to make sure that
    he alerts the passengers if he’s going to do any sudden turns or suddenly speed up or
    slow down so that they know that they’re supposed to be hanging on. Doug King: It’s always a good rule to have
    one hand on the boat and one hand for yourself just in case the skipper does something that
    you’re not expecting. And I think the other thing as a general rule,
    any children or people that really can’t swim that well should be in PFDs. Steve Lague: We all know the best laid plans
    don’t always work, and sometimes people do fall overboard. What’s the first thing a skipper should do
    when that happens? Doug King: Well, the first thing that should
    happen, whoever sees the person go over the side should yell out, “Man overboard.” Passenger: Man overboard, port side. Doug King: It’s also important that they tell
    the skipper which side of the vessel that the person went over the side on, because
    that’s the way you want the vessel to turn so the propellers are moved away from the
    person that’s in the water. Doug King: The skipper then, on hearing the
    word ‘man overboard’, should immediately, if they’ve got a GPS or a chart plotter, hit
    the man overboard button, particularly at night because you need to be able to get back
    to that position where the person was. Doug King: The person who saw the person go
    over the side needs to keep a watch on them, because while the skipper’s trying to turn
    the boat, he won’t have them in view. So the passenger really needs to keep a good
    view of the person that’s there. It’s then up to the skipper to approach the
    person in the water downwind so that the boat won’t blow over the top of them. The key here is to make sure that when the
    skipper gets close to them, he’s going very, very slowly and by the time he’s got the person
    beside the boat, he’s got it out of gear because you don’t want the propellers turning around
    while you’ve got someone in the water. Doug King: It’s then just a matter of getting
    the person back in the boat. If the person needs help to get in the boat,
    the best way to do it is to get them under the arms and dunk them in water, not putting
    their head under but push them down twice and then heave them in. This will give the momentum to allow you to
    pull them into the boat.

    Articles

    Coast Guard Boating Safety PSA Casting Off

    October 13, 2019


    Hey guys how you doing? Couldn’t ask for a nicer day, huh? Nah its beautiful. Gonna get some big ones. Anybody want to wear a life jacket? Nah man, I’m good. Na. No life jackets, that’s a deal breaker. Daddy you promised. Daniel Stephen. rrrrf…rrrrf Give me one of those life jackets. This message brought to you by the national
    safe boating Council and the women who nag you [clears throat] love
    you.

    Articles

    Coast Guard Boating Safety PSA Rebecca Giddens

    October 13, 2019


    I think winning an Olympic silver medal is pretty cool. You know what else is cool Paddling through flat water and white water. But what’s really cool is being in command
    of your boat. You gotta learn the right moves like always wear a lifejacket while paddling. And never paddle under the influence. So be cool! Be responsible! Wear your life jacket. Remember you’re in command. Boat Responsibly. This message brought to you by the US Coast
    Guard.

    Powerboat vs Sailboat
    Articles, Blog

    Powerboat vs Sailboat

    October 4, 2019


    [music playing] A powerboat skipper and crew
    are out for an afternoon ride when they come upon
    a sailboat that’s sailing upwind in a small bay. Because of the water
    depth, the sailboat must tack frequently to
    remain in deep water, and the power
    boater is bewildered by his frequent
    change of course. The navigation rules
    for power vessels sometimes differ from
    those of sailing vessels. It is important to
    know how to interact with the different types
    of vessels and scenarios you will encounter
    while on the water. Can you tell how these power
    boaters should approach this navigation dilemma? The powerboat’s
    skipper determines that in light of this
    sailor’s erratic path he’ll just plow straight on. After all, where in
    the rules does it say they can take the whole bay? When powerboats are
    crossing, the boat from port shall keep out of the way
    of the vessel to starboard. The power boaters
    anticipated that the sailboat would stay out of their way. The power skipper
    was clearly miffed. The collision was avoided,
    but was this the best plan? The power crew has watched
    the sailboat change course many times in a few moments. What’s up with that? The powerboat’s skipper
    explains the sailors are constrained by
    their draft and have to tack back and
    forth frequently to stay in a safe depth. The power skipper has been
    watching to anticipate the length of each tack. A vessel under sail alone
    must tack back and forth through the wind and sail
    a zigzag course upwind. When sailing in
    shallow bays, sailboats with drafts of six
    or more feet need to keep a sharp eye on
    the depth meter and chart, and may be required to
    tack the boat frequently. In a passing situation,
    the powerboat shall keep out of the way. The powerboat
    skipper should plan to pass either well ahead of
    or else astern of the sailboat. And in tight channels,
    the powerboat may benefit from running
    just outside the channel, if depth allows. [music playing]

    Articles

    CBS4 Outdoor Boating Safety

    October 3, 2019


    BUT FIRST, HERE’S A LOOK AT THIS MORNING’S WINNING LOTTERY NUMBERS. CBS4 THIS MORNING WILL BE RIGHT BACK. BUT FIRST WITH THE RETURN OF SUMMER-LIKE TEMPERATURES, MORE OF YOU WILL BE HEADED OUT ON THE WATER FOR AT LEAST SOME OF THE WEEKEND. AND AS IS PART OF WHY WE’RE REALLY EXCITED TO BRING YOU A NEW SERIES FOR OUTDOOR BEFORE WE GO TO BREAK OUR RESIDENT BOATER CHIEF METEOROLOGIST CRAIG SETZER TAKES YOU OUT ON THE WATER. Reporter: JUST LIKE CARS HAVE TRAFFIC SIGNS AND LIGHTS, THERE ARE ALSO RULES OF THE ROAD FOR BOATS. LET’S CHECK THEM OUT. WHEN DEALING WITH CHANNELS AND MARKERS, IT’S IMPORTANT TO ENTER THE CHANNEL AT THE FIRST MARK. MARK NUMBER ONE IN THIS CASE BECAUSE JUST OUTSIDE OF THE CHANNEL, IT COULD BE VERY, VERY SHALLOW. THE CHANNEL MARKERS INDICATE WHERE THE CHANNEL IS. THE DEEPEST PART OF THE WATERWAY. AND IT’S IMPORTANT TO STAY IN- BETWEEN THE RED AND THE GREEN. AND IF YOU GET CONFUSED ABOUT WHICH COLOR GOES WHERE, JUST REMEMBER THIS LITTLE TIP. RED, RIGHT, RETURN. LEAVE THE RED MARKS TO YOUR RIGHT WHEN YOU RETURN HOME. WHILE MANY HAZARDS TO BOATING ARE MARKED OR LIGHTED AT NIGHT, SOME AREN’T, SO YOU ALWAYS HAVE TO KEEP A LOOKOUT FOR WHAT COULD BE OUT THERE. WHILE MINIMUM WAKE DOESN’T HAVE ANY SPECIFIC SPEED REQUIREMENTS, YOU NEED TO GO SLOW ENOUGH AS TO NOT CREATE A LARGE WAVE BEHIND THE BOAT. IDLE SPEED NO WAKE MEANS YOU HAVE TO GO AS SLOW AS THE BOAT CAN GO. BUT MAINTAIN MANEUVERABILITY. IF YOU ARE HEADING OUT INTO THE OCEAN, YOU CAN USE GOVERNMENT CUT AS LONG AS THERE AREN’T TWO OR MORE CRUISE SHIPS IN PORT MIAMI. ON THE GOVERNMENT CUT, CRAIG