Browsing Tag: cruising

    Queen Mary Ship Hotel Tour – Cruise Tips TV
    Articles, Blog

    Queen Mary Ship Hotel Tour – Cruise Tips TV

    January 23, 2020


    Welcome to a brief glimpse of what was once
    the finest ocean liner the world had ever seen. Regal, historic and legendary, welcome
    aboard the Queen Mary. Check in with us now as we take a quick tour of this majestic vessel. Stroll the halls and enjoy the lovely art,
    or relax in the comfy sitting areas and let yourself be transported to a time when nothing
    matched the grandeur of steamships. Shopping aboard the Queen Mary is a unique
    experience. Beyond the standard nick knacks and touristy gift shop items, are one of kind
    treasures for the discerning shopper. The thoughtful craftsmanship of the shops is really
    something to see as well. Take the time to appreciate the wraparound windows with their
    shining trim and polished wood frames as you window-shop. The rooms, like the rest of the ship, are
    warm and inviting. This particular room is complete with a large comfy bed, two beautiful
    view portals, and flat screen TV and tons of storage space. There are many restaurants on board including
    the Verandah Grill, Sir Winstons and the Promenade. After dining, stroll the deck and take in
    the beautiful views. Here you’ll find a lovely romantic gazebo perfect for weddings,
    and stunning views of Long Beach. If you continue walking you wont run out of interesting and
    historical finds. Here is one of the lifeboats that was created to replace the originals
    after she was brought to Long Beach. Step out on the bridge wing uniquely designed to
    deflect wind, or simply marvel at the sparkling Navigational Bridge. The views here not to
    be missed This legendary vessel has evolved since it’s
    launch in the 1930’s from a stately ocean liner, to a World War 2 troopship, and finally
    to the regal floating hotel she is today. If you are traveling with kids, or you are
    a kid at heart you’ll want to swing by the Captains Arcade. There are not a lot of games
    here, but certainly enough to excite the young and young at heart. There is also a very nice gym complete with
    modern workout equipment and flat screen TVs. If you’ve got the time, you’ll want to
    check out some of the tours. The engine room is a must see. And the Russian Scorpion sub
    is absolutely fascinating. Check out Ghosts and Legends for a spooky treat. That’s it for our tour of this historic
    ship turned hotel. If you like this video please click the like button, and subscribe
    to more tips and tours. Check us out on Twitter @CruiseTipsTV, and we’ll see you on the
    high seas.

    The Nude Latitude – Free Range Sailing Ep 31
    Articles, Blog

    The Nude Latitude – Free Range Sailing Ep 31

    January 15, 2020


    – Well if the wind
    generator has got anything to say about it, it says that it’s doing
    about eight to ten knots. – [Pascale] Mm-hmm – So, we’re gonna leave. We’ve got about 300 miles to
    go and we’re gonna go across the Gulf of Carpentaria,
    and end up in Weipa. – And just like that, we
    said goodbye to the Northern Territory, and headed east
    for Weipa in Queensland. (light-hearted music) – So we’ve got our bush walking bag out. Not because we’re going bush walking, but because in here is a PLB. What’s a PLB? A PLB is a Portable Locator Beacon. Or a EPIRB, a little portable EPIRB. We’ve also got a inflating life jacket. And that’s got a built in harness to it. So what’s gonna happen
    is, anyone whenever one of us is asleep or inside
    and not out there watching, whoever’s on watch is
    going to be tied to this. They’re going to be
    clipped on to the yacht so they don’t go overboard. If they do go overboard,
    then I want an EPIRB strapped to that life jacket. All right, and if you end up in the water, and this goes off and
    you’re floating there, especially in the
    tropics, it’s a big place, you want this EPIRB right next to you and you want it going off. So I guess the first thing
    that we should do before we strap it on, give it a test. Yep. – [Pascale] Did it flash? – It works. So I’ve tested it. The batteries are good. It’s running well. It’s in date. I have just made sure that
    it’s, the batteries in date and everything’s tested. We do have a larger EPIRB for the boat, so this is our secondary one. So this is going on to the
    harness, on to the life jacket. And anyone that’s out
    there tonight, Pascale. – [Pascale] I’m safe mom, see? – As safe as she could
    be with this lunatic on the high seas. (Pascale laughing) (peaceful music) – Good morning. I’ve been on my watch
    for about three hours now and it’s been really magic. We’ve had the spinnaker
    up most of the night, all of the morning, I started my watch. We’re not going very fast. We’re going like two
    and a half, three knots. There’s barely any wind. It’d be like eight knots
    with wind or something. We’re just coasting
    along, like walking pace, crossing the gulf. The sun’s been reflecting off
    the water and onto the windows of the boat, it’s just so beautiful. And the spinnaker has this
    amazing, pinky color to it. It’s really beautiful. I just, I feel very, very
    grateful that we’re having a crossing over the gulf and
    we’re not getting flogged. We’re not going head to
    weather, we don’t have big seas, we don’t have big swells. It’s just so awesome. So, so cool. (upbeat music) – [Pascale] Good morning. – Morning, baby. (yawns) Feels like I was awake til 3:00. (Pascale laughing) Might untie that lazy
    rope just ’cause it just keeps just dangling in the sea and– – [Pascale] Oh yeah? – We’re never gonna jibe this thing. Oh good, you switched out the camera, ’cause I got no pants on. – [Pascale] Okay. (laughing) (upbeat music) It’s pretty much windless
    right now and we’re here too. Or we’re just floating, aren’t we doll? – Uh, heave too, we got the sail up. It’s pointing to the wind. – Okay, and we’re gonna go for a swim. Troy’s even going to check
    the prop and see if we need to give it a little bit of a clean. – ‘Cause I’m just a work-a-holic. – He’s a work-a-holic. And I’ll just probably
    gonna check him out good and make sure that no
    sharks sneak up on him. (laughing) – It don’t take long to get a
    shark come up off the water. Give me that scraper and
    we’ll see if it comes back. – [Pascale] Okay. Here ya go. – Usually after a bit of
    scraping on metal, any shark that’s around will come
    back up and investigate. But he’s being pretty boring. Jump on in. – [Pascale] Yep. – Put the camera down, come on. – [Pascale] Shark! There’s sharks down there, there’s lots. Holy shit. I’m gonna get the camera. – [Troy] The spear, head spear. – [Pascale] They just
    came all of a sudden. – [Troy] They love that
    scrape, scrape, scrape, eh? – [Pascale] I was like,
    they’re gone, they’re gone, they’re gone and then whoa! There’s like 20 of them. This has got, the spear’s
    got the thing on it, eh? It’s got the cap on it? Ow. A pretty ordinary occurrence
    in the Gulf of Carpentaria? Did you do this last time you were here? – Well, it’s a lot better
    if you’ve got someone to keep an eye on your back for you. – [Pascale] Because the first
    one before the school came, really like came fast at us. And then– – Well the thing is, like
    you’ll be working away, and no shark, then you
    turn around and there’s 30. – [Pascale] Yeah. They just came out of the blue. – Literally out of the blue. – [Pascale] But it’s so
    cool because I’ve never seen water that clear before. – And that many sharks. – [Pascale] Yeah, and that many sharks. It’s cool out there. – Yeah, it’s a lot of fun. It’s quite cool. If we’re in there and a big
    bully or a big tiger shark showed up, then we’d have
    to be a bit more cautious. Ya know? But those little sharks are fine. – [Pascale] How big are they,
    like five foot or something? – Five, there was a couple of
    six and a half footers there. – [Pascale] Yeah, so they were
    like my size and your size. But they seem smaller. But I guess they’re just a bit,
    they must have been further away than I thought ’cause
    the water’s so clear. – Yeah, there was some, that
    little one that came right up, he was only a four footer. – [Pascale] Yeah. – He’s only just a baby. – [Pascale] That’s why I was cocky. – They cause so much
    trouble, little sharks. – [Pascale] Yeah. – The big old ones are like,
    “Ooohh,” and they stand off, but the little ones are just like, “Oh what’s that, what’s that”‘ – [Pascale] Maybe there’s
    something like near it or that I can– – Yeah but, then they get
    in close, and then they take off, they’re all excited. And everything’s just like,
    oh what just happened? – [Pascale] What’s that? – Then the next thing you know
    all the big ones are excited. And then it just goes to hell. – [Pascale] Well, that didn’t happen. ‘Cause we just had this
    spear pointed at them. And if they came too close,
    you just stare them down and start swimming towards
    them with the spear. – Yep, look like you belong there, and look like you’re hungry. – [Pascale] How deep is it here? – 52 meters. – [Pascale] 52 meters. – I’d say you can’t, you
    can make out a bit of color on the bottom. – [Pascale] It’s pretty good visibility. I’ve never seen visibility
    like this before coming from WA. – Well, we’re going to be doing
    more of that in Queensland. And, we’ll have our
    underwater camera again. – [Pascale] Yay. – A little fun with sharks, Pascale. We’ll probably get another
    couple knots out of that. That propeller had a
    lot of barnacles on it. – [Pascale] Yeah, right. – So we’ll, and that’s why
    the sharks get excited. There’s just a nice trail
    of stuff going down. But, no we’ll do, we’ll do really well. So we’ll check that out. We’ve got the midday doldrums. I’m hoping we’ll get
    some afternoon breeze. We’ll see, ya know? – [Pascale] At least
    we’re a bit cooler now. – Yeah. – [Pascale] And the boat’s
    gonna go faster hopefully. Looks like a shark to me. – [Troy] Oh, it is. – [Troy] That would be
    a tiger, a little tiger. – It’s big, isn’t it? – [Troy] Pascy got a marlin. Oh no, what are we gonna do? (laughing) – Oh it’s hooked in there. That’s where it gets hooked, is it? – [Troy] No wonder it
    ran like fucking crazy. – Oh my god, I caught a marlin. – [Troy] Keep pulling it up. Pull it up. Oh, that’s not a marlin, it’s a sailfish. – A sailfish. – [Troy] It didn’t take
    to the air, though did it? – No. – [Troy] All right,
    we’re gonna have to try and release this. – Yeah. What’s that sticking out of it’s gill? Yeah, it’s recording now. Goodbye sailfish. Wow. – [Troy] So what do you
    think about that, Pascy? – First sailfish. – We’d actually prefer a
    mackerel, that’s the sort of fisherman we are. – Or tuna. – [Troy] And naked fishing
    seems to be working out. – Yes. Just a general naked gulf crossing, it is. – [Troy] It is, isn’t it? Same kind of weather. Well, I’ve been out-fished
    by Pascale, yet again. So there ya go. Good work. Here we’ve got Pascale. She’s nicked the dish washing
    detergent because if you didn’t know, it lathers in salt water. – Yep, and it gets rid of all that grease. – [Troy] So what’s gonna happen is, first after the first clean with salt water and then we’ve got a bit
    of fresh there, Pascale. – Yep, we have the water maker
    running during the morning ’cause we’ve had the, we’ve
    had to motor ’cause there’s no wind in the gulf at the moment. – [Troy] Yeah, oh well,
    there’s always swings and roundabouts, isn’t there? – It’s an added benefit. Get to have a fresh water wash. – [Troy] I think that’s
    second round with that morning fresh that would later a lot more. – K, so rinse it out
    and morning fresh again? Oh hello. – [Troy] So this second round looks a lot more successful, Pascale. – Yeah, I think we’re, I
    think we got rid of that first sorta grease and this is better. After this one I can give
    my hair a fresh water rinse and then use normal shampoo. – [Troy] Yes. – I’m gonna smell delicious. – [Troy] You are gonna
    smell absolutely fantastic, unlike me. – This is one of the reasons
    why we go to water bay here on real. So I can wash my hair. – [Troy] Spoiled she is. So I’ve got the old cut off bottle. When sailing, you come to
    appreciate the little things. – And it’s good to remove
    all the hair out of the cockpit so it doesn’t
    end up inside the boat. – [Troy] That’s how we
    celebrate catching sailfish around here. – Hair washing. It’s awesome that we caught that sailfish. That was cool, but we really want food. We’re gonna make urad dal this afternoon ’cause we’ve run out of meat. – [Troy] Yeah, we’ve just ate the last of the fish just then. Not too many mackerel around here. There’s no structure so
    we’re just hoping for a tuna. A tuna would be good. Not a sailfish, not a marlin. No game fish. – [Pascale] Is it a tuna? It’s a tuna? – Tuna. – [Pascale] Oh yes. That is great news. It’s a shami for dinner. As long as a shark doesn’t come. – Yeah, just pull it out of the – [Pascale] Yeah. – It’s not a bad fish. – [Pascale] What is it? – When you do get a tuna on
    board, no matter what you do, quite a bit of blood comes out of it. They’re a fast moving fish
    they need a lot of oxygen into their tissues. They’ve got a very high blood volume. You want to get that out. I put the gap into it. A lot of blood just
    streamed out of that tuna. So I’ve obviously hit something hard. Normally when you open up
    this side, and in there, an enormous amount of blood
    will come out that tuna really, really quickly. You want to cut down through
    the membrane that joins to the gill there. K, so we’ve cut there. This line here behind
    the fin, a shallow cut. It only needs to be less than
    an inch deep though there on both sides and a slice at the tail. Then you can omit this one. But that one is very important, and cutting on the throat as well. When I brought the fish on
    board, I scraped it’s head. And there you can actually
    see a larger white patch. That’s where the brain is. Right through there. Most fish you can’t scrape it and see it. But with tuna you can. So that will give you an
    instant kill on the tuna. And that means the fish
    is not suffering any more than it has to. If you’ve never seen a tuna before, these things rely on really high speed. And they are voracious. So this fish wanted to eat that lure. It’s a halco laser pro, and
    it’s in that color scheme for it to be interested. That seems to work in the
    gulf, doesn’ it, Pascy? Catches sailfish and tuna. – [Pascale] Sailfish and tuna. – Really large eye, okay. So they’re a sight predator. This fish, when it decided that it was
    gonna take this other thing on, there’s no cutting teeth in here. Tuna just have grabbing teeth. Oh, that’s what they’re eating. – [Pascale] Sardines. – Mmm, they look a little
    bit like little miniature trevally sort of things. – [Pascale] Oh yeah. – They’re not sardines. – [Pascale] Okay. – I’m not sure what they are. So that’s what that fish has been eating. But it decided that, that
    would do just as well. So no teeth in there. That was gonna swallow that whole. Because they rely on
    speed, if you look here, built into the fish is a
    perfect recess that the fin can go down into leaving
    that perfectly smooth. Likewise, these little
    ventral fins, they also fit down into their very own, there’s a little groove in there. So when the fish puts them
    away, they are perfectly smooth and tucked away also. And here, you can’t see it
    at the moment because there’s a groove here, but if we look. – [Pascale] Look at that. – That just slots down perfectly into an actual slot in the body. That is gone. These fins are fixed. But then you have these
    other little fins that can just adjust side to side. Just like that. And the speeds that these
    fish swim at, that is enough for precision control. So when they swim, they
    stop and they’ll glide. They’ll swim up and then down. Up and then down. So during their glide
    pattern, they can make minute adjustments with this as
    well as sticking that out. And look, the angle gives
    it lift like an aero foil. So these things are amazing. They’re delicious, but they’re amazing. So, long tail tuna. Before I process this tuna
    or really any bloody fish, I’ve got this scabby old deck broom. I do like to just clean up as much
    of the slime as I can. And then I’ll clean this and give it a bit of a bleaching afterwards. That will make handling the
    fish a lot easier for you if you do have a bit of
    a scrubbing brush there. ‘Cause all fish have a top of slime which is anti-bacterial, anti-biological. Stops them, it’s their
    antiviral, if you like. It also helps them slip through the water. It’s their first line of defense. Reef fish have it thicker than these ones. But all fish have it. So that is kind of handy
    to give them a wash down. I think Pascale, that this
    is going to be delicious and very welcome. – [Pascale] Yes, definitely. – So that’s us for fishing now. I think this should be
    enough fish to see us through to Weipa. We’ve only got another
    day and a half, I guess. – No time to stop around here. – [Pascale] It’s just a
    little bit hot right now. – It’s gotta be 100% humidity. – [Pascale] You just walk
    around and you’re like dripping with sweat. – Not even a breath of a breeze. – [Pascale] April, April weather. – Unreal. This is what used to kill
    the old mariners though, get stuck in the doldrums, for weeks, throw the horses overboard. Like there’s only me and Pascale, I can’t throw her overboard. (light-hearted music) – We find that long tail tuna
    is at it’s best after it’s rested in the fridge
    for at least 12 hours. (light-hearted music) What’s that noise? – That’s the noise of silence. – [Pascale] Such a relief. Three knots, we are. – Three knots. This is where that wind
    vane modification paid off. ‘Cause there’s no way a
    wind vane would operate now. I can only just feel the breeze. Oh, that’s a nice little breeze there. – [Pascale] I can feel that. – Probably picked up to
    three and a half, eh? Yep, bingo, ba-da-bing. – Ba-da-bing. – [Pascale] Spinnaker is
    getting a pink color again ’cause it’s sunset. – We just wanna keep our
    fingers crossed that this isn’t just the– – [Pascale] The sunset
    breeze, the sea breeze. – We’re a bit far out for
    this to be a true sea breeze. But yeah, as the sun falls
    we get that shift each day. And we can’t guess when
    we sail through the night. We should be getting wind
    now at the end of Wednesday. There’s supposed to be
    lower winds, not no winds. Supposed to be picking itself up now. And then over the next few
    days, an easterly shift. So we should just slip into where we’re just in the nick of time. – It’s our fourth day and the motor’s on here, there’s no wind. I guess we’ve got tuna in the fridge, I might eat sushi for breakfast. – In the sushi rolls
    there’s tuna, mayonnaise, wasabi, and a sprinkling of sesame seeds, and of course sushi rice mixed with vinegar and sugar to give it a delicious flavor. (upbeat music) – I just wanted to increase to about eight knots and just go a little more to the north and then we can use it. We haven’t had any wind. We sailed out into a doldrum, didn’t we? It’s like a great big heady of nothing. I just want to go sailing. – [Pascale] It’s not much to ask. – It’s not, I hate motoring. Maybe if I loved motoring
    more we’d get more sailing. I’ll try that. – [Pascale] Love this. – Boy I sure do love motoring. – [Pascale] You got your wind. – Tropical sailing. Zero to 20 knots, in 15 seconds. – [Pascale] Quickly put a reef in. – Hogged a reef in. Our baggy wrinkle. They chafe, the protection on the stays that people keep asking about. They’re working really well. We’re keeping the battens off the stays so they won’t erode our sails. I had to change the sensitivity
    of the order, I call it. So it will handle it a bit better now. We’re back at with it. What are we doing? Five and a half knots now so that’s getting into Weipa at 2:00. – [Pascale] Nice. – Well, we’ll see. This wind is associated with
    all of this weather ahead. – [Pascale] Storm system, yeah. But it was the north
    westers we were hoping for. Or not, is is more of a– – It’s a straight northerly. – [Pascale] Northerly, right. – Bit of a localized low-pressure
    system just over there. Winds, whew, coming in. It’s all good. (upbeat music) – We just pease this a little. A little catch of the wind on the side. – [Pascale] The steering working? – The steering’s working. But, what happens with
    an electronic auto pilot it averages all of the
    corrections either way and then slowly reduces the
    air out until it’s steering. So in a very rudimentary sense, it learns. So when you’re doing something
    like this, as soon as you make a bit of a change,
    the balance of the boat the autopilot goes, what so it has to relearn again. See how it’s settled in now? – [Pascale] Yeah. – So yeah, basically
    that’s what it’s doing. In it’s little basic brain. It’s adding up all of the corrections taking the average and trying to find that medium path. (upbeat music) – Well is often the case
    with sailing in the tropics, things change fast. That sprang upon us pretty quickly. And it was a whole lot
    of fun surfing before it. But now that wind is shifting
    and it’s gone to the north. So it’s directly in beam of us. So we’ve had to pack all that away. I guess we ran with it
    for about 45 minutes, almost an hour. But now it’s just straight as a beam. So we’re just doing a beam run into Weipa. And it looks like we’ve only
    got about two hours to go. That’s to the outside of the leads, because Weipa’s a pretty major port. So there is shipping
    leads to go through there. We’re not actually gonna get
    to an anchorage in two hours it’s still a bit of time to
    go, they’re very long leads. But that’s a great opportunity
    to catch some more fish just before we go on land. Okay, some of this
    greenish cast in the water visibility is down a bit here. So actually we’ve put the
    lure in about three quarters of a boat length. Just a bit over eight meters out the back. A lot of the yachties
    that I see are fishing and they have poor results. One of the things is I put
    it down to is they’ve got it so far away from the boat, they think the fish
    are scared of the boat. That is not the case. If you’re sailing particularly. Aahhh! If you’re sailing in particular
    with no motor running, fish will come up and check it out. If you ever see whales, or
    whale sharks, or something big in the water, they’re
    usually surrounded by fish. If you are trolling out
    there and you’d like to experiment a bit, try getting that lure a
    bit closer to the boat. ‘Cause trust me, fish will see
    a dark shadow and they’ll go, “what’s that?” Go and have a look, “Oh
    yeah, it’s just a whatever, whether they’re interested or not. But then your lure will
    come immediately after and they’ll get that thing. One of my commercial mates
    Mackerel, he was always two meters down, eight meters back. That was his sort of thing. Everyone’s a bit different. But he was relatively successful. – [Pascale] Saw a wave. – We’re pretty successful. – I don’t think we go
    too many miles without getting something, Pascale. (music drowns out speaker) – [Pascale] No. – [Pascale] Whilst we didn’t
    get the mackerel we were hoping for, we were pretty
    excited to get this beautiful skip jack tuna. You can see this tuna is really red. – [Pascale] Yeah. – That is really, really red tuna. A lot of people don’t like this but, when it’s cooked, it’ll be
    quite firm and it’ll go pale, like chicken. Pollo del mar. We’ll give it a go. I’ve got all the blood out of it. We’ll have a go. It’s still quite warm. But once it’s chilled, I don’t
    know, it might be acceptable. We’ll see what we got, Pascy. – [Pascale] Challenge? Fish tiny gullet. Can’t even filet a tuna when you’re doing seven
    knots across the sea. – [Pascale] That’s why I’m filming. I’m in awe. (light-hearted music) It was amazing to see ships
    after having spent four days in the gulf not seeing a single boat. Arriving at the leads in Weipa
    we had to be very careful because there wasn’t much
    distance between the shoreline and the lead marker. And there was a large
    ship exiting the port. (upbeat music) I’m always amazed at how
    impressively big those ships are up close. (upbeat music) Well, we’ve made it to Weipa. This is my first time in Queensland. – [Troy] First stop in Queensland. – My first stop in Queensland. So we’re here. It’s steamy and cloudy. But we had some great wind
    coming in which you would have seen so that was awesome. – And you’re first fish in
    Queensland waters was a sailfish. – Yep, pretty epic. So we’re gonna put the anchor down soon. We can see anchorage just ahead. There’s a few yachts there
    and a few fishing boats. So it looks good. And I know this is a ramble but anyway. I can’t remember what I was gonna say. We’re definitely gonna sleep
    well tonight, aren’t we doll? – There’s some good coconuts there. – We need a new a pair of binos. It’s busted, look. We have to look through one hole. – That’s okay. – Give ’em some money on
    Paypal so we can get a new pair of binoculars, please. – The poor man’s sexton. I’m taking land shots. – We’re doing sightings with busted binos. We need your help, please. Well folks, I hope you
    enjoyed the crossing. I’m gonna stop rambling now. And, we’ll see you in Weipa. If you enjoyed this video,
    please hit the like button because it makes it more
    likely that YouTube will suggest our video to a broader audience. Also we’d love to hear your feedback. So head over to the
    comments and drop us a line.

    SOVEREIGN Ship Tour & Review (Pullmantur)
    Articles, Blog

    SOVEREIGN Ship Tour & Review (Pullmantur)

    January 14, 2020


    Welcome to Royal Caribbean’s Sovereign of the Seas… …oh wait, Pullmantur’s Sovereign The centrum is at the heart of the ship and is home to the onboard shops,
    and general facilities like guest services and the library. Staterooms aboard Sovereign are nothing to get excited about They are very small and lack
    character. At least the beds are comfortable though. Sovereign has two main restaurants. The food is delicious and the menu offers plenty to
    choose from, including my personal favourites, the chicken soup and the chocolate tart! The buffet is very spacious and offers stunning views out to sea. The daily paella dish is
    always popular. Serving Asian cuisine on the high seas, Wú
    is Sovereign’s main speciality restaurant. Dishes are priced individually and range from
    €5 up to €10. Set menus cost €20 or €25. A cruise ship dedicated to the Spanish market isn’t quite complete without serving tapas.
    With affordable pricing ranging from just €1 to €3, selections include meatballs,
    chicken wings, roasted octopus and Spanish omelette. Welcome to Rendez-Vous. This is a great place to come and have an evening dance and learn some moves as well. The nautical-themed Spinnaker Bar is one of my favourite venues onboard. This is 360 Bar & Lounge aboard Pullmantur’s Sovereign. and this is a perfect place to come, sit down, and enjoy a drink with impressive views over the sea. The beautiful Broadway Show Lounge is the main entertainment venue aboard Pullmantur’s
    Sovereign, and is home to the lively production shows put on by the Sovereign show team. If you enjoy dancing to popular music, then the retro neon-pink Zoom Disco is the place to be at night onboard Pullmantur’s Sovereign! On top deck, you can soar to new heights on
    the rock climbing wall, have a game of tennis, or relax in one of Sovereign’s pools. Sovereign is a stunning vessel and if you’d like to find out more about the ship, and life onboard visit our website, CRUISECAPITAL.CO.UK, for an in-depth ship review.

    Elafonisos paradise island, Greece 4K | Best beaches and places – Travel Guide
    Articles, Blog

    Elafonisos paradise island, Greece 4K | Best beaches and places – Travel Guide

    January 14, 2020


    Elafonisos
    Peloponnese – Greece The place to be There are some places
    Algunos lugares Elafonisos island
    Southern Peloponnese That you will remember forever
    para siempre A strip that resembles a path to heaven… Beauty
    belleza blue experiences
    experiencias This summer a paradise waits for you sweet melodies
    deep feelings sentimientos 323 kilometers south of Athens Elafonisos village making you wanna return
    volver again and again Tasty Greek cuisine Freedom
    Libertad – Freiheit Elafonisos
    your secret blue paradise paraiso azul I love to travel Love is waiting for you this summer
    este verano Simos Camping Beach
    Sarakiniko in Greece
    en Grecia – στην Ελλάδα Natura 2000. Elafonisos has a wealth of flora and fauna which is confirmed by its inclusion to the European network of protectes areas. Let the picture reveal all those things the words cannot describe… There are some places you will never forget! Have you ever dreamt of the amazing colors of nature, coral and emerald shades with gold and white grains of sand? sand dunes Relaxation Elafonisos is your hidden Paradise Adventure Panagia beach Are you ready to experience this? Authentic Lefki beach crystal blue water Let’s go on an adventure! The only trip you will regret is the one you don’t take “To travel is to take a journey into yourself”
    – Danny Kaye Erotic Small simos beach Ten minutes transit time by ferry from Punta Tiny island
    immense beauty mythical greek blue exotic best choice This summer will be the best of your life! all in your hands passionate alternative Elafonisos waits for you
    this summer! romantic Elafonisos,
    your new favorite destination Like this video, tell us your opinion, write a comment. Share! Runnismos Travel Guru
    Contact us: [email protected] Thanks for watching this and subscribe for more adventure, impressive pictures and breathtaking travelling videos!

    It’s the Gulf of Mexico! | Sailing Soulianis – Ep. 32
    Articles, Blog

    It’s the Gulf of Mexico! | Sailing Soulianis – Ep. 32

    January 14, 2020


    – On the other side of
    that wall is salt water. (upbeat music) – [Kirk] That’s a crazy looking ship with a helicopter landing pad on its roof. – Feels like we’re comin’ home. – Oh my God. All right, let’s go
    find our mast (laughs). – We can sail again! (upbeat music) Last time on Sailing Soulianis, we showed you our typical
    routine traveling down the river. That routine wouldn’t last long though, as we left you all with a little
    over a hundred miles to go before reaching the end of our journey from freshwater to salt water. – [Kirk] Okay so where are we? – We are at the last lock, on the other side of
    that wall, is salt water. – [Kirk] Brackish water. – Same thing. (Kirk laughing) – It’s salty right? – [Kirk] It’s prolly a little salty. – Yeah, I mean, it’s salty water, let’s put it that way, it’s salty water. Look at that, it has no wheels. – [Kirk] Lauren is fascinated
    by the no wheeled bollard. – It doesn’t squeak at all. – [Kirk] Yeah, it’s pretty cool, check out the setup we have goin’ on here. We’re usin’ out spinnaker tie-down spot combined with our
    miniature little deck cleat to form a nice little U midship. – And a virtually maintenance-free, oh that’s not right, a virtually, what’s the word I’m looking for? – Effortless?
    – Effortless. locking situation (laughs). I haven’t had my breakfast yet. – [Kirk] You’s good at da words. – (laughs) yeah. (upbeat music) – [Kirk] Ah, the sky. (upbeat music) – We’re almost to the ocean! (upbeat music) – [Kirk] That’s a crazy looking ship with a helicopter
    landing pad on it’s roof. Either that or it’s a spaceship
    teleportation station. (upbeat music) Wow, to be able to pick
    up a tow like that, those tires are taller
    than that truck next to it. (upbeat music) Holy crap! Lauren it’s the Gulf of Mexico! That’s the ocean! (Lauren laughing) (laughs) that’s the ocean! – Kirk that’s the ocean. – That’s the ocean. All the way from fresh
    water to salt water. From Michigan, to the Gulf of Mexico. We made it! – Feels like we’re comin’ home. I know we’ve never been here,
    and it looks weird right now, I shouldn’t say weird, it looks industrial and not like home at all. Looks completely uncomfortable
    and scary, but out there, just beyond that horizon, is palm trees, beaches, clear blue water, warm temperatures, that’s all I got. – Lauren. – Kirk. – We’re gonna be a sailboat soon. – Yay! – That’s a big old mound of water. (upbeat music) We are just about to pull into the marina that has been holding our
    mast for the past month, to be reunited so that we can
    turn back into a sailboat. That’s a sweet boat. (Lauren laughing) – [Lauren] I took off the
    microphone to shoot photos but, – That’s okay. – [Lauren] Tell me how
    happy you are right now. – So happy right now. We’re gonna have a beautiful sunset, then we’re gonna get a nice cool rain, which is gonna kill all the bugs, they’re all gonna go
    away, every one of ’em. We just washed all the salt, and dirt, and Mississippi mud, no, Tennessee mud off the boat. Drinking a boat beer. Stoked. – [Lauren] Oh hi boat. – I am a happy chappy. – [Lauren] Well the rain
    did come that first night, and the second night, came the snow. – [Kirk] Oh my God. (ice crunching) – Morning.
    (Kirk laughing) you like the snow? – [Kirk] This is kind of messed up. – [Emily] Yeah. (ice crunching) – Snow and palm trees,
    this is really strange. It does make it feel
    sorta Christmasy though, which is kinda cool. – [Lauren] By the third day,
    most of the snow was gone. – [Kirk] Where are we headed? – We’re gonna go see our mast. – We’re on the most southern
    part of our journey thus far, and it is the coldest. (Lauren laughing) Oh look it, there’s
    Mike and Cindy leaving. – [Lauren] Oh yeah. – All right, let’s go find our mast. – [Lauren] (laughs) someone’s happy. (upbeat music) – [Kirk] There she is. – We can sail again! She doesn’t look too bad love. – [Kirk] No, everything’s
    still all wrapped up. – [Lauren] Yeah. (upbeat music) – [Kirk] Cool, think we’re gonna remember how to put everything back together? – That remains to be seen, that’s a big question mark. I mean you took a lot of photos, right? – [Kirk] No you were taking the photos! – Oh right (laughs). – [Kirk] You took a lot of photos, right? – Yeah, but you took a bunch before we even left Wisconsin I thought. – Mmm not really.
    – Mmm. Yeah I took a bunch of photos. – [Kirk] Okay. (Lauren laughing) – We have four days until we’re scheduled to have our mast re-stepped. What do we have to attach to
    it before it actually goes up? – [Kirk] Our wind vane, our
    VHF, and our wind indicator. – Oh that’s it? – [Kirk] Well, and all
    the halyards and stuff. And I also want to figure out if we can put a different block up here for running our spinnaker
    halyard internally. So yeah, we got some work to do. Jeez I almost forgot about our boom. (laughs) that’s an important piece, that’s over here. – It looks perfect.
    – Yeah. All right well, at least it’s all here. – Yeah. – [Kirk] Look at that, that’s pretty good. – Yeah.
    – They put foam over the whole thing.
    – All the way over, yeah. – [Kirk] Well, I think we
    did a pretty decent job. – Yeah, yeah look at
    this carpet on the end. (knocking) (Kirk laughing) The sun feels good.
    – Yeah. – In this 40 degree temperatures. – [Kirk] Shall we get breakfast? – Breakfast, I’m hungry.
    – And the mast. – Breakfast and mast. – Sunday morning mast. (Lauren laughing) So, I’m going to be
    unwrapping our mast here, gettin’ everything ready to
    get put back on the boat, get it re-stepped. We’re gonna maybe do a few upgrades. We’re gonna look at
    replacing our mast headlight with an LED, and our
    deck light with an LED. And then we’re also going to try and get the halyard for the
    spinnaker run internally. But first things first, we
    gotta get this thing unwrapped. ♪ And I don’t know ♪ ♪ What to say ♪ ♪ What to say to you ♪ (upbeat music) ♪ It’s always sunny where ♪ Well I got everything off, and I still have all the rigging tied up ’cause I need to come
    back with the spreaders, and all the other tools and
    things to get everything sorted. She looks okay, not
    too worse for the wear. ♪ So bright so bright ♪ ♪ You can stare at the sun ♪ ♪ You can tell me anything you like ♪ The next day we gave the mast a good bath. We used soapy water and Simple Green, and ran the entire length
    of each stay as well. We wanted to make sure we got
    the mast as clean as possible because we weren’t sure
    when we were gonna have an opportunity like this again. After the bath, it was time to install the new exit sheave for
    our spinnaker halyard. – That’s going to be the
    end of that basically, so I’m gonna put a hole there, – Mmhm.
    – And then I’m gonna cut, – Oh that entire,
    – Yeah. – [Lauren] You’re basically
    cutting a giant almond shape, – [Kirk] Hole, yeah. All right just watch
    the, there’s gonna be, (drilling) – [Lauren] Holy hell Kirk. You’re cutting a hole in our mast. – Cut a big hole in the mast. (Lauren laughing) – Yeah, it’s a little scary. (drilling)
    (upbeat music) – [Lauren] Look at that,
    brand new VHF antenna, pretty snazzy. ♪ You can stare at the sun ♪ ♪ You can tell me anything you like ♪ ♪ I’ll take you away to the sunshine ♪ – [Kirk] After completing the work on the lower part of the mast, we had to install an identical
    exit sheave at the top. ♪ You can tell me anything you like ♪ (upbeat music) So, when you’re tapping the screws, you want to go forward, like a quarter turn, and then back a little, and then forward a quarter turn, and then back a little, ’cause you don’t want to
    build up too much pressure, or else you’re just gonna
    rip the threads out, ’cause you’re literally cutting metal, but it’s like really fine, you know? Bruce taught me that. So thank you Bruce. (knocking) Sweet. – [Man] So basically it
    goes around my finger, coming from the opposite direction around, and I can pull both the standing part, and the working end to tighten the knot. – That’ll work, okay. All right so now, what
    I want you to do is, where’d that other end go? – It’s right here.
    – Right here, okay. I want you to take that end
    and pull on that from here, and you can start to coil it up. – [Lauren] We’re running
    on the lines on the mast before it gets stepped this afternoon, when we become a sailboat again! (upbeat music)

    How to Clean the Bottom of a Sailboat Underwater! (Tips from the Pros #4 /Patrick Childress #55)
    Articles, Blog

    How to Clean the Bottom of a Sailboat Underwater! (Tips from the Pros #4 /Patrick Childress #55)

    January 13, 2020


    your boat doesn’t have to come out of
    the water looking like this on sailboat ‘Brick House’ we’ll show you how we clean
    our bottom and then we’ll go to Hank Schmitt from Offshore Passage Opportunities to give his tips from the pros number four how to keep your bottom
    clean. Hello I’m Patrick Childress in over twelve years of living on our
    sailboat Brick house Rebecca and I have never found a bottom paint that does
    what it’s supposed to do what the advertising says that it will do
    we’ve always ended up having to scrub the bottom much sooner than ever expected so we
    normally use a hookah and up here we’ll put a link to video number 12 which
    shows how we use the hookah for scrubbing the bottom especially after
    we’ve been sitting for several months in one harbor and the marine growth really
    does accumulate and at the end of this video will show you some underwater
    scenes from that video but Hank Schmitt from offshore passage opportunities has
    a very good system for using a scuba tank which you don’t have to strap to
    your back and be so encumbered under the water so he’s going to show us how to
    start with scrubbing the waterline and then go deeper using the scuba tank and
    not wear it into the water okay so we’re getting set up to go ahead and clean the
    bottom of the boat I’ve been cleaning bottoms for about the last 25 or 30 years
    and at first we’d set up like most divers with a BC jacket and and
    regulator and all the weight belts and everything but I found it was much
    easier just to have a tank and a long 25-30 foot hose which I’ll set up right
    here in the middle of the boat and if you have a dinghy you could also put it
    in your dinghy but this keeps you from having to get a BC jacket and the weight
    belt when it’s time to clean your bottom and you’ll see how we can actually clean
    most of the bottom and we’ll demonstrate that in a little bit just by
    having the tank set up in the middle of the boat. we open it up so it’s
    ready for us we all the way open and back a little bit and I’ll just leave it
    right here in the middle I’ll go ahead and get set up to enter the water and as
    you’ll see I can clean most of the boat without having to use the tank and I
    just have that ready for me when I need it so I’ll go in the water and it’s all
    set to go when I need that for cleaning the prop for the bottom of the keel
    maybe the bottom of the rudder we’re gonna go ahead and get in the water now
    and we’ll show you how you can clean your boat pretty much about as big as
    forty forty five feet without using a tank if you didn’t have a tank if you
    weren’t certified but of course having a tank makes it certainly easier for
    cleaning off your prop or the bottom of your keel but really to clean the bottom of your boat
    the water isn’t that cold you don’t need a wetsuit or anything you just need a
    few things so we’re gonna go in with our swim fins
    a scraper of course for getting any barnacles or anything if you have
    barnacles on the bottom of your boat or anything then you really should you just
    be hauling the boat out and painting it a diver is not to keep from having to
    paint your boat once a year or once every two years for scrubbies they’re
    actually three different grades of scrubby’s one is like a sponge almost
    and that’s when you’re racing or you keep it clean a lot then the red want a
    little bit more abrasive and then you might be familiar with the black ones
    which are really for cleaning your barbeque grill and if you have to use a
    black one again I would usually just tell the owner of the boat save the
    money that I would charge you for diving and putting it towards a short haul so
    you shouldn’t have to be taking barnacles off the bottom of your boat if
    you have barnacles on the bottom you vote you need to paint but I know our
    bottom is not that bad so I’ll be able to use the lightest grade scrubby you
    can you don’t want to use anything more abrasive because then you’re taking the
    bottom paint off and again bottom paint as you know is very expensive 250 to 400
    dollars a gallon so the idea isn’t to put it on and then scrape it all off so
    again you want to use the the lightest scrub you can also very important are
    the suction cups because again imagine you’re in the water and as you’re
    cleaning the boat you’re pushing yourself away so they sell these at your
    marine supply stores also any glazier windows they also have suction cups for
    moving big pieces of glass so you want suction cups I put a line on there so I
    don’t lose that and then I’ll just have the scrubby on the other side I do use
    gloves again for barnacles you don’t want to scrape your hands if it’s really
    cold water you’d want to use a wetsuit but it’s not too cold today so just swim
    fins again if you want you can use booties my booties are more worn out
    than my gloves so I don’t use booties anymore and up here where the water’s
    dirtier I do like to put on a hoodie as well with a mask just any any mask I
    don’t use the snorkel at all because again I’m gonna be holding my breath
    cleaning the bottom of the boat and coming back up and you’ll see that
    demonstration in a little bit so again you don’t need a lot of a lot of tooling
    a minute ago you saw we set up our tank so we don’t have to worry about a BC a
    buoyancy control jacket or a weight belt even you’ll have enough with the suction
    cups to be able to take care of that so you’ll eliminate a lot of gear a lot of
    maintenance without the BC jacket so just a tank, a tank and long hose in the middle of
    the boat or you keep it your dinghy in the middle of the boat and I’ll just
    need that really for cleaning anything off the prop or the bottom of the keel
    so with that we’ll get suited up and see you in the water
    okay so I’m all suited up with my stickems – my suction cups…and hopefully I’ll get
    away with just my sponge type and I leave my other scrubby and my my putty
    knife near me so I could reach it when I’m in the water so just go in make sure
    you hold your mask okay we are in the water I generally
    like to start at the bow you see just okay so you could see the contrast where
    it was already cleaned and where it’s not and basically it’s my suction cups
    in one hand and I’m right-handed so I have this scrubby in the other and I’m
    just doing wipe wipe I hold my breath as I go down get to the middle of the
    bottom of the boat then work my way up the other side and I just continue that
    and that way I can do probably 90% of the boat without the having to use the
    tank or the regulator so it saves you from using a lot of air so when I was
    commercial diving I could do eight or ten bottoms with one tank so I wouldn’t have
    to make as many runs to do it and again if you’re out cruising around you don’t
    have to go and get your bottle filled as often. They do sell smaller pony bottles
    which you could probably do the whole boat bottom with just a small five or
    ten-minute pony bottle because again you only need it for your keel and for
    your your running gear your prop and your shaft if you have any barnacles
    there so it’s really just hold my breath wipe wipe….. and i come up again…work on down, more wipe wipe I don’t even have to hold my breath on
    the top. And I head back down. And i just keep going, all the way around. Probably once every 2 month if you’re not racing if you are racing then you
    might want to do it before each race. Very simple.
    okay so I’ve cleaned 80% – 90% of the bottom I have my regulator set up
    25-foot hose connected to the tank on deck. It could be on your Dinghy I just pull the
    hose down now because I’m ready to clean the bottom of the keel then I’ll get the
    putty knife and I’ll go ahead and clean the the strut, the prop, and the
    shaft and then we’re all done so I only need this for the last part of the last
    part of the cleaning the bottom. Thank You Hank I hope this video was
    worthwhile for you if it was please give it a thumbs up and also click on the
    subscribe button if you haven’t already also there is a link to the tip jar in
    the video description if you don’t mind helping out in that
    direction now here’s some of those scenes from when we were anchored for
    three months in Sri Lanka (cleaning the hull, cleaning the chain, cleaning the prop on the bottom of our sailboat Brick House) Propspeed from Oceanmax worked great for 2 years, so it made cleaning our bottom a lot easier than before. After 2 years, we are applying it again (hauled out now for Coppercoat, Propspeed and more)

    Norwegian Cruise Line – Norwegian Breakaway Cruise Ship Tour
    Articles, Blog

    Norwegian Cruise Line – Norwegian Breakaway Cruise Ship Tour

    January 12, 2020


    Norwegian Cruise Line, the 4.028 passenger Norwegian Breakaway, set sail with passengers for the first time on April 26, 2013. Built at the Meyer Werft shipyard in Papenburg, Germany, the 146,600 ton Norwegian Breakway is the largest cruise ship ever built in the country. At 1,062 feet, it’s longer than three football fields, and it has 18 decks. The hub of the Norwegian Breakaway’s top deck areas is the Aqua Park, a family-friendly fun zone that is home to five multi-story waterslides. Located on Deck 15, the Aqua Park also has a SpongeBob-themed watery play area for smaller children. Norwegian Breakaway’s Aqua Park has two pools and four hot tubs. A close-up of one of the two pool areas atop the Norwegian Breakaway. The five water slides at the Norwegian Breakaway’s Aqua Park include the Whip, a pair of side-by-side twister slides. More areas for lounging atop the Norwegian Breakaway can be found on Deck 17 near the front of the ship. Another lounge area is located at the very front of the ship, overlooking the bow, on Deck 17. Vibe Beach Club on Deck 16 is an extra-charge, adults-only oasis with its own hot tub, lounge chairs and full-service bar. Located near the pool area, the Uptown Bar & Grill serves burgers, hot dogs and other quick bites. Norwegian Breakaway’s top deck also is home to a rock-climbing wall. Located at the back of the ship, Spice H20 is an adult-only lounge area by day and an outdoor dance club by night. It boasts two hot tubs, a waterfall, full-service bar and a giant video screen. A three-story sports complex located just behind the ship’s main funnel includes the line’s first outdoor ropes course. Norwegian Breakaway’s ropes course is the largest at sea. The multi-level structure features more than 40 elements, including a zip track. The ropes course extends from one side of the ship to the other and includes The Plank, a platform that extends eight feet over the vessel’s edge. Norwegian Breakaway offers more than a dozen restaurants, including Brazilian-style steakhouse Moderno Churrascaria. The $20 a person eatery’s specialty is grilled and slow-roasted meats that are carved tableside by passadors. Adjacent to Moderno Churrascaria on Deck 8 is Cagney’s Steakhouse, a Norwegian signature that costs $30 per person. Located between Cagney’s and Moderno is the circular Prime Meridian Bar. Deck 8 also is home to a small shopping area with jewelry, clothing and Norwegian Cruise Line-related items. A circular opening provides a visual connection — and stairway access — between the restaurants and nightspots of Decks 6, 7 and 8. The Shaker’s martini lounge. Like other Norwegian Cruise Line ships, Norwegian Breakaway has a sushi eatery called Wasabi. Prices are a la carte. New on Norwegian Breakaway is Ocean Blue, a seafood eatery run by Food Network star Geoffrey Zakarian. More than 50 electronic screens around the ship allow passengers to make bookings for restaurants and shows — a first in the industry. The screens also offer general information about venues around the ship as well as easy-to-follow directions. Located on Deck 8, La Cucina serves Tuscany-inspired Italian dishes. It costs $15 per person. In addition to interior seating, La Cucina has an outdoor seating area along the ship’s the Deck 8 “Waterfront.” The Deck 8 Waterfront features outdoor seating areas for a number of restaurants and bars, including Shaker’s. Designed with New York supper clubs in mind, The Manhattan Room on Deck 7 features a large dance floor as a focal point and is the site of live music and dancing during meals. Among the entertainment in The Manhattan Room is a ‘Burn the Floor’ ballroom dancing show. Norwegian Breakaway has a stylish, contemporary decor that extends to the ship’s hallways, including elevator areas. The Breakaway Casino on Deck 7 is home to more than 300 slot machines and 26 gaming tables offering poker, black jack, roulette and craps. O’Sheehan’s, a pub-like sports bar and grill that first debuted on Norwegian Epic in 2010, is back in a similar form on Norwegian Breakaway. It serves fish and chips, burgers and other classic pub food. Amusements include miniature bowling, pool and air hockey tables, and interactive arcade games. Norwegian Breakaway’s Breakaway Theater is home to the five-time Tony Award nominated Broadway show ‘Rock of Ages.’ Like Norwegian Epic, Norwegian Breakaway also houses a circus tent-like space for a circus-style dinner show. Called the Spiegel Tent, the venue is home to ‘Cirque Dreams: Jungle Fantasy,’ a traveling circus show that has played in more than 200 cities. The show costs $29.99 for general seating and $39.99 for premium seating. The shore excursions desk, located on Deck 6. A bar at the base of the atrium. A large open seating area on Deck 6 faces a giant screen that is used to show live sporting events and other entertainment. The Atrium Cafe features baked goods from “Cake Boss” star Buddy Valastro’s Carlo’s Bakery. An art gallery area is an element of Deck 6. Le Bistro, Norwegian’s signature French restaurant, is back on Norwegian Breakaway with indoor seating as well as “Atrium Al Fresco” seating outside the restaurant at the base of the ship’s central atrium. It costs $20 per person. Located in the ship’s atrium on Deck 6, Savor offers traditional cuisine with a contemporary flair. There is no extra charge to dine. Touch screens around the ship show the seating availability at restaurants. The Norwegian Breakaway’s fitness center is located high atop the ship on Deck 15. The fitness center has dozens of weight and cardio machines as well as free weights. The Entourage teen club is a dedicated fun zone for 13- to 17-year-olds. The most luxurious of the 2,014 cabins on Norwegian Breakaway are the 42 suites found inside The Haven, a private enclave at the top of the ship. Here, the living area of an Owner’s Suite. Owner’s Suites feature a bedroom with a king-size bed, a separate living room with dining area, and a large modern bathroom with separate shower and tub. Among the many amenities found in Owner’s Suites are specialty coffee machines. Owner’s Suites also come with concierge and butler service. Owner’s Suite bathrooms have double sinks as well as walk-in showers and large tubs. Owner’s Suites also feature a large amount of storage space, including walk-in closets. The cabins can sleep up to four. Even larger than Owner’s Suites are the ship’s two Deluxe Owner’s Suites, which measure 936 square feet and sleep up to four. Bedrooms in the two Deluxe Owner’s Suites feature king-size beds that face floor-to-ceiling windows and an extra-spacious wraparound private balcony. Each of the Deluxe Owner’s Suites can be joined with an Owner’s Suite to create a grand suite that sleeps up to eight people. Deluxe Owner’s Suite bathrooms have an oversized bath tub, two modern vanity sinks and a large shower. The tub area in a Deluxe Owner’s Suite bathroom. Deluxe Owner’s Suites have large walk-in closet areas. A Deluxe Owner’s Suite balcony. The Haven also is home to 18 Haven Courtyard Penthouses. At 334 square feet, they are smaller than Owner’s Suites but still significantly larger than standard cabins. Located near the Haven’s private courtyard, the Haven Courtyard Penthouses have bedrooms with king-size beds, and a living and dining area. A Haven Courtyard Penthouse balcony. A Haven Courtyard Penthouse bathroom. The closet found in a Haven Courtyard Penthouse. Another high-end option on the Norwegian Breakaway are its 20 Haven Family Villas, which have two bedrooms and two bathrooms. They measure 559 square feet and sleep up to six people. The Haven Family Villa’s master bath has a large shower, an oversized oval tub that looks out to the sea and two modern vanity sinks. Haven Family Villas have a separate living room and dining area that includes a pull-out sofa bed, writing desk and bar. The balcony of a Haven Family Villa. The second bedrooms in Haven Family Villas have a double pull-out sofa bed that is connected to its own bathroom. The second bathroom of a Haven Family Villa. Like all Haven cabins, the villas come with a private concierge and 24-hour butler. The most common category of cabin on the Norwegian Breakaway are its Balcony Staterooms, of which there are 960. The 204 square foot Balcony Staterooms have queen beds that can be converted into two twin beds and feature a clean, contemporary design. Balcony Staterooms have large, streamlined bathrooms with plenty of lighting. Balcony Stateroom bathrooms have a shower but no tub. Enclosed vanities in Balcony Stateroom bathrooms hide a trash bin as well as storage space. More storage is available in large drawers under the sofas in Balcony Staterooms. The streamlined, built-in desk and storage area of a Balcony Stateroom features a television, mini-bar and coffee maker. The desk area of a Balcony Stateroom has four electrical outlets, two on a U.S. standard and two on a European standard. All cabin categories – including Balcony Staterooms, shown here – come with a mini-bar. The balconies for Balcony Staterooms have two chairs and a small table. Balcony Staterooms have large closets that feature areas for hanging clothes, shelves and a safe. A look inside the closet of a Balcony Stateroom. Norwegian Breakaway has 449 windowless inside cabins that have two twin beds that can be converted into a queen. Many of the inside cabins have pull-down bunks and can sleep up to four people. They have small desk areas and televisions, and measure 151 square feet. Inside cabin bathrooms are similar to those found in balcony cabins. Norwegian Breakaway also has 120 oceanview cabins that have windows but no balconies. Here, what’s billed as a Family Oceanview Stateroom. The Family Oceanview Staterooms measure 161 square feet and have two twin beds that can convert into a queen. The twelve Haven Penthouses measure 505 square feet and have a bedroom with king-size bed and a separate living room. The cabin category is different than the Haven Courtyard Penthouse. The living room of a Haven Penthouse has a double sofa bed, writing desk and dining area. Haven Penthouse bathrooms have two bowl sinks, a curved oval bathtub and separate shower. A Haven Penthouse balcony. There are 248 Mini Suites on the Norwegian Breakaway. The 236 square foot cabins are slightly larger than standard Balcony Staterooms. Mini Suites have a king-size bed that can be separated to form two smaller beds, a large closet, a sofa bed with additional storage and a built-in desk area. Like standard Balcony Staterooms, Mini Suites have coffee makers. The biggest difference between a Mini Suite and a Balcony Stateroom is that Mini Suites have bigger and more elaborate bathrooms. Mini Suite bathrooms have a large double sink with two faucets set against a mosaic glass-tile backsplash, additional storage space under the sink and a larger shower than Balcony Staterooms. The showers in Mini Suite bathrooms feature rain-shower heads and multiple body spray jets. Mini Suite balconies have two chairs and a small table.

    Wharram Pahi 42 Project Boat Tour & Update from Luckyfish – Ep 101 Sailing Luckyfish
    Articles, Blog

    Wharram Pahi 42 Project Boat Tour & Update from Luckyfish – Ep 101 Sailing Luckyfish

    January 12, 2020


    Well. It’s a bit of a mixed bag this week. It’s January the second 2020 and it’s already shaping up to be a really exciting year. Yeah, huge news is we’ve got new girl crew coming. Can you guess who it is? We take a look at Caleb’s Pahi 42 and have a look at a project boat. He bought it two years ago. He’s been working hard on it ever since. Maybe he can help you decide whether a project boats for you. At the end of that we’ll take you for a walk around Luckyfish. See what work’s been going on there. Oh yeah. I had the surveyor in during the week, how I should get his report next week and in the meantime keep an eye open for our launching. We’re going to be doing it live on YouTube probably early next week. At this stage we’ll be announcing it on Patreon also on Facebook and as long as you’ve got notifications turned on on YouTube, you should be able to join us. Okay. Let’s head out to the water with Leo as he wears the life jacket for the first time. Taking a lancha down to meet Caleb Wright. We thought this week we might do something a bit different and look at a couple of other Wharrams. Hey Leo what do you think about wearing a lifejacket for the first time? They’re not very comfortable and But it might save your life You can see the scale of it. For sure. Yeah. It’s bigger than the Tiki 38, that’s for sure. Okay. We bought the boat two years ago and we’d actually been interested in Wharrams for awhile. I’ve seen a few videos and I found out that Boatsmith is actually there in um, East part of Florida and my wife was talking to me about what kind of boat we wanted. Yeah. We stopped by and said hello and two hours later after, uh, after having a wonderful tour, beautiful boat, he was building, uh, my wife said, I get it. I get why you like these boats and you know, she said, this is a good idea. On the way out the door. He tells us, Oh well, you know, these do come up as projects occasionally. And I said, well, you know, I have a fairly long timeline until I’m able to go and I don’t mind projects. That’s an opportunity to get one, a good price. So it also takes advantage of your labor and some other things. So, uh, we said thats of good idea if you hear anything, let us know. And 45 minutes down the road, he said, Oh, on Wharram and Friends, they listed about 45 minutes ago. It’s the model of boat that you want, the sailing that you want to do. It’s priced well, be aggressive, good luck. So a few weeks later, I find myself here with the builder’s Jake and Kathy, and heard their story of building the boat in San Francisco. You bought it from the builders. Oh, that’s good. Good. And they cruised it all the way down to the Panama canal through the Panama canal and made it back here to Rio Dulce yes, and were just having a great time. But you know, eventually you end up with life forces that move you away from certain things and they recognized that, you know, it was time to let the boat go to a new owner You know, we, we came to an agreement. So, um, it was unfortunate timing for me because I had taken a hurricane disaster relief job and we actually closed the deal after I’d been stationed in St Croix, helping with them, Maria and Irma. And so I couldn’t come back down to the boat for six months. So six months, the boat was here in the yard and we had people working to correct. Any monor rot that had occurred. So was it in the water when you bought it or what was it? It was. I have a beautiful photo right when I rolled up to it, the water and there’s, there’s beautiful Palm trees behind and the tarps and it looks perfect. So you knew instantly that you were probably already sold even though you were trying to keep a level head about it. It was the love at first sight versus the engineer in me Yeah yeah, the conflict. Yes. Well, you always got to follow your heart in the end, right? You’ll never regret following your heart. She had been tied up over at the Marina nearby and she had lost her forward beam. Um, a tourist had hung on the motors and uh, knocked at least one of them off. And so they took them both off to get repaired and when they found out how much they were going to cost, they just sold them for the parts because they had been well-used at that point. So she didn’t have any motors and they had made some improvements or some modifications for the sailing where we sail which I felt were a good direction. And um, we had the forward beam was not really a beam was just a piece of wood. The, um, other beams had various States of issues from water ingress. So these all new beams with, um, the forward and aft beam are new and the mast beam is new. Everything else was reworked, stripped back down to bare wood. Hang on, there is only 4 beams… so that’s 3 of them are new. No, 1,2,3,4,5. You’re missing the short beam in the middle. Okay. Is there a short beam in the middle is there? Sure there is the mast step beam, so when the mast is stepped on this centerpiece here and then the beam just AFT of it is, is there one of those on the Tiki 38 Yeah. Okay. I don’t know much about Pahi’s. They are the femine version of the Tiki, thats all I know. They’ve sure got some sweet curves That’s exactly right. Well, you know, a lot of boating um, you know, ends up being fairly serious. People take their boats very seriously and they name them serious things. We wanted to be out having a good time and be friendly and happy and fun and uh, the curves of the Pahi were very appealing. We’re gonna go, uh, we’re overbuilt and simple enough to modify things as we need to as we go. And we’re going to be fine and have a good time. Yeah, it’s a doing boat. Exactly. Well, the original plan were just open deck boards and when I bought the boat, they had put part of the repurpose deck pod beneath the deck to store the dinghy and some other things in front of the deck pod and deflect wave somewhat. And we got into the cockpit and realized there’d been some water ingress and, and so I took it from one thing I like about the Wharrams you can kind of build on the shoulders of giants improve on them the way you’d like to be improved. So what I took that as is, you know, this is a good storage space. Um, I wanted to add some more systems, a board, and I didn’t want them to intrude in the living space. So this, this first beam, uh, here between the deck and the mast beam and this, this beam ends up being the, uh, anchor and rode storage, right? The windlass and potentially some additional tankage depending on how much space I need for my a windlass. But I think I could put a fuel tank there quite easily. And then, uh, this box that you see here is weather tight box that we fabricated to how’s the battery bank and the inverter and any other sort of, um, water sensitive electronics that we didn’t necessarily want in the cabin. So that’s what that’s for. We have this main helm area that’s a passage between the hulls Uh, we’ve got the helm, our controls for our two outboards and all of the electronics will get mounted in this box while it’s some of the, uh, switches or the navigation lights otherwise. And then you can see the, uh, the aft part of the cockpit, which was formerly, uh, two seats facing each other per the plans. When I got it. It was one seat facing forward with, uh, a little table in front, which was nice, but I didn’t really like that. Um, it’s hard to climb over the beam. My wife’s not very tall, so she wouldn’t have liked that. And also we, we had a few things. We wanted to have a board. I like to cook and my experience cooking on boats has been, it’s hot below and tends be a little seasick conspiring sometimes. Yeah. So I decided that what I wanted to do was to use that aft part of the cockpit as a big square space on a boat, which is hard to find. And I wanted to put all the propane and appliances so nobody wakes up dead. And uh, that’s it. So there are no propane going into any of the hulls It’ll house a brand new Dickinson stove we just picked up today. It’ll hold a precision temp, um, propane hot water heater for when we go into the colder climes up closer to home in the fall and winter. And then, uh, they’ll be plenty of countertop space for preparing food, uh, et cetera al fresco And then we have a two foot wide section at the end that you can’t see that’s going to be flex space. So if we want to put extra coolers in there or if we’re living somewhere, and maybe it’s nice to have one of the portable laundry machines, ice maker or whatever, we don’t know yet. There’s space for that. You really like that behind that. We extended the rear platform a little bit. So we’ve got a swim platform that’s maybe three feet deep and we have the motors mounted on the Wharram design sleds that’ll lower from there. And between this, the two motors which we mounted fairly wide, we’re going to have a four foot wide ramp that we’re going to make out of some aluminium extrusions. And I think we’ll be just perfect for the Takacat. Just slide up underneath the rear beam, haul up out of the water and be free. The below deck layout. Well the two hulls it’s slightly different but very similar, very forward compartment possibly in case you hit something is a watertight storage locker, which takes all the sails. And then behind that we have a, on the starboard hull we have a double berth, which is quite comfortable followed by a nav station, some more counter tops, oilskin skin locker and then uh, the head with the shower. And then behind that, the AFT, um, berth which doesn’t have sitting head room. So it’s probably gonna end up being storage or a space for children to stay in when we get here. And on this, on the port side, uh, so the port side is very similar. We have the storage locker, the forward berth. And then, uh, this area is, uh, an area for a settee, or at least it’s a table we’ve set up from both sides that’s convertible into more sleeping area, which is great. And then after that we’ve got a little open area to set bags down, uh, possibly Howes, uh, extra coolers and things for long passages if we decided to do that. And then the original galley is still down there. And so I’m going to repurpose that as a second head on the boat. And we’re using the nature’s head composting toilets. So we don’t have any tanks board and uh, I think they’ll save us some weight and some trouble being in various situations. So that’ll give us, uh, was basically a two, um, two room. Oh, you’ve got a port in the starboard and that’s your one big state room on each side. And each, each one has its own bathroom. And if you think of it that way, it’s a lot simpler. Well, may we go below? Yes, you may. It’s under construction, but uh, come on down these steps. Um, when you have construction done in Guatemala, you’re not here to explain. They take a couple iterations. This is a second iteration and there’ll be a third. So they’re a little tight low. Hello, this is fun. Do you like boats? I can tell this area gets a table. Um, there was a table when I bought the boat. He got put in storage. There are termites here. The termites got the tadpole. So now I get a new table, it’ll be of a cow, BA and mahogany. And, uh, that’s what I wanted. So it’s nice and uh, that’ll fold down into this position. Christians will be available here. This will be the forward birth that show up they started working on is where the, uh, the 4,200 BTU air conditioner I found out of Fort Lauderdale and that route power systems a unit and it’ll be, so you’ll run it off your 12 volt through an inverter. Will you, I found a nice, uh, grid tie, um, Magnum and Berger and it’s, it’s set up to supplement from the docs. Do you have a brownout? It’ll pull from your batteries and it’ll charge your batteries. It’s a combination charger and burner, which is very nice. What brand? Magnum Magnum Mica. Yeah. They’re out in the Northwest Seattle area, I believe. Maybe Oregon. Exactly. You crossed it out against the victims. And you know, I probably did not spend as much time looking at veterans as I should of Victorians seem to be very well regarded. Magnum does as well. And maybe not so much in the Marine industry, but as far as the rest of the industry goes, they seem to be very big and they were us made and I like that. So that’s what I bought. Have you had to dig a lot of rod out of the Bay? You have really, you know, there were a few areas we identified early on. Yeah. So what happened with the audit? I mean that leads me to ask what happened with the honor. I mean, what happened and what was the story that meant they Oh yeah. Um, that meant that I let it go, you know? Well, I think that they, uh, like so many people have a dream of sailing and they get here or they get out of, uh, they get out of their element where they are making some money and they have ideas. But it’s hard to make those ideas happen when you’re one having a lot of fun and two out of an economic zone that you have skills in. So I think that pretty common for people is that they go and they build up a kitty for cruising and then they go cruise until they run out of money and then they take the boat home and you end up with time to build up the kitty you get and go again. That’s a nice cycle. So it was good to balance. I think that the boat, this boat particular was not sea worthy and was not, um, you know, able to be moved anywhere. I used it in Guatemala for a number of years to die and then they were absent for a while. Is that what happened? And then that deteriorate? I don’t, I don’t know the exact details, but the gist of the story was that the time here versus time to make money, was that a balance as far as what needed to get done and the attention that needed to be paid. Because you know, they built the boat, they loved the boat. They weren’t going to just hand it over to somebody to build or fix. They were here working on it and, and so when you have the, the, the mindset that this is how it’s going to happen and we can’t do that anymore cause that’s the way I want it to be, then that’s the honest thing to do. And so they, I think they did the right thing. Salva did the right thing for the boat. Yeah. Well Dan did the same thing, was lucky fish. He didn’t let it go though, but he said it was going to guy, you know, he had a baby and held the drink. Yeah. Well, he built, he built the dream and then he sold it, paid any months and then they fell pregnant and he realized that he wasn’t going to have time to put into looking after a timber boat. So he put it on the market straight away. And of course, you know, we bought it when it was in prime. Pray by Nick you. It’s been an ambition to keep it that way, you know? Yeah. That’s been great. He may build a good bite and then he might’ve really responsible decision at the right time to get rid of it. You know, it’s hard to let go. Yeah, that’s right. It must’ve been so tough for him. For somebody in upper more upper bracket income these mornings deals when you, yeah, sure. That’s a good deal. I agree. States plugging those things on your channel actually. Again, you know, because you don’t have to give up your job. Right. And which is a huge sacrifice. Yeah. And the best thing is if you get a captain to do charters and he’ll look after your boat and you’ll have, your engines are a good shape, you know, you, they don’t wreck it out because they, they tend to wear them. When I worked for Sibley’s wheat, we had about eight of one brand of boats and we had one with no name on the back. And if we had been scavenging parts of one to fix all the others, then the owner was coming down, we’d just put his name on the back of that boat. And as your vote, swear to God, swear to God. Another one is Steve stories that can’t go to air as far as the rock goes in the boat though, you know, the thing that, that was me, you know, me being new to warms and that was a bit of a surprise was I have surveyed the boat and I’ve found a few areas awry and we got quotes on those to be dealt with and they were dealt with. And that was the bulk of the work. Um, money-wise and timelines, were they in common? You know, common areas, areas people looking at could look out for, um, you know, beams or any place, anybody put a hole in anything is important. But there are lots of other areas, corners where the boat may flex a little bit or, uh, particularly where somebody may put glass over it and then think, Oh, that’s not round enough. And they sand it down, get back through the glass and then you have no protection. So the, the, the point that I wanted to make was that, uh, when this people come out to paint and they start sanding, that’s when you find everything. Because it could just be a little area this big or it could be this big, but it’s only going to take that first chip of paint for somebody to know that it’s a problem. And so it was a bit disheartening for me as I was trying to get kids out of high school and into college and, uh, trying to work and support my family through my wife’s military career and some other things and do my own thing as an engineer and my own work, uh, to come down here on a regular basis and, and think, Oh, we’re going to paint it this week. Oh, well it didn’t get painted because we found some more rot and they’re fixing rot. And then you come down again and another month and they found some more, right? And they’re all in small pieces and it doesn’t add up to much money because the wood is cheap and the labor is cheap and boatyard is cheap. But when you’re ready to knock it out of the park and go sailing, it’s, it’s a, uh, it’s an exercise to know that it’s the budget thing to do and you have a boat that’s in better shape. If you take care of everything you start with and they got some, you want to get a silent and it’s just another step backwards. You keep going backwards for a while, don’t you? When you start renovating boats? Yes, yes. It’s that a 80 20 rule, 80% of it gets done in 20% of the time. The last 20% takes forever. And you sooner or later you just have to say, well, maybe that doesn’t actually have to happen. You’re talking to boat Smith. He said there’s projects and gave an example, somebody who picked up a boat for less than 20,000 and I said, well that’s a great idea. And he said, well, the guy who bought it spent a lot of time working on it and he’s a hard worker. So you know here this, you can find the same thing, a lot of so you can find it, find a big boat like a pay 42 or let’s say a Tiki 38 for around the 20,000 Mark with rod and with issues and maybe needs new sales and all the electronics will be out of date. Right? So it depends on what you’re, what you want. Do you want a boat you can take off with right now? That’s going to be okay. Or do you want a boat that’s going to be great. That’s exactly the way you want it. So you get the boat to this stage now, which is looking pretty close. I mean, you know, you’ve got final paint on over most of the boat. Um, what do you reckon you’ve put into it? Well, you know, so we bought it for less than 20,000. Yeah. We put about same amount into it in the boat yard, which over the two years it’s been here off and on with me visiting and lots of work stoppages waiting for me to answer questions because my Spanish is bad. Um, and then probably the sound out and engines and electronics and refrigerated coolers and perhaps another 40 sung into it so far. Yeah. What do you reckon to give them the water now and, and you know, have the boat as you want to, you got to live. Uh, not much. Okay. Not much at all. So you’re going to end up with a 42 foot for under a hundred grand that ECS in fully renovated condition, probably ready to go with a bit of touch up. There’s nothing more than a bit of touch up needed for the next 10 years. Pretty good belly. Absolutely. Kylie, thank you very much. That’s been a great tour and uh, hopefully the view is of uh, got some inspiration from your story. I’m sure they have. I’ll take you for a walk around the hall and you can see the ones that have turned up for this year. What we’ve got here is the hatch over the head and it’s a glass though the hatch and the glass is just starting to de-laminate around this hinge area. It’s dancer ear, the side looks all right. These are the sorts of things we need to get on, do straight away. The marvelous thing about the worm is you can just about maintain the entire bite with nothing more than hand tools and that’s the wonderful thing. Or they’re dealing with a wooden boat. Extra, you know, too much. That’s beyond your reach when you come to fixing it without being dependent on other people. I’m just trying to further this edge of the fiberglass glass back into the, that looks fairly solid right here. So it’s just a matter of getting a bit of a bevel. They join us. Say when I put the epoxy filler in to make up for the glasses finger emerged little fairs and, and it’s not going to de-laminate again, we’ve done this several times over the last few years in different spots where the glasses lifted and uh, you know, no, no recurring problem. That’s the main thing. When you fix something you want to fix it once and that’s it. When we come out to, I think, you know, I’m thinking around 10 years for an annual refit for the spine, like a major refit, dismantle the house, pull the pod out, type of things off, have a look at the beam troughs, you know, if she makes it through the 10 years without any need to do it early, I think that’s a huge success. So they sort of areas can be looked at again. And so you have a holding up, maybe the hall hatch needs reclassing maybe the hall hatch needs replacing. None of, it’s a big deal. It’s all modular. It’s all plywood and timber. There is a bit of library hours involved. How are we ever, you know, I’m, my suspicion is that they sort of fixes again the last 20 years. Well that’s it really. I’m just going to hit this with a bit of denatured alcohol and get the water out of the wood and get it ready to put the epoxy filler. And he has a fix on the same hedge that was done, uh, two years, maybe three years ago, back in Grenada. And, uh, the key thing here is, you know, I opened it up with a Hexcel blade, got the epoxy in and the Craig hasn’t reoccurred. So that’s a process that’s been repeated every year on the Spire tag, not just the hatches of course, but all around the beams on the house sides, the top deck areas, anywhere where there’s little things, a little cracks and try to get onto them straight away. So, yeah, most of those cracks I was showing you earlier, they’ve been opened up with a Hacksaw blade to, to gouge out the deteriorated wood chisel if necessary. The bigger areas, we’ve got a sand paper to get things ready for the, so lucky. These are the side decks by the side of the engine boxes. I’m just touching them up. Um, these are whole areas where the hinges, uh, rope hinges are lashed through. They were all pretty deteriorated. They earn constant use. Of course, every time we start and stop the engines, we open up these engine box lids. I’ll just come around the other side and show you what I’ve done there. So there’s about 80. What I’ve done is, is drilling each one had oversize, put a bit of tight underneath it and then filled it from the top all the way to the top of just pure epoxy resin. So yeah, just to meet an air of drilling that out with that probably a three mill or right drill, the tight, the blank lashings that make up the hinges and a, they shouldn’t be good for that. It looks like a fairly solid fixed there. They should be good for another few years. Actually, some of these things underneath the beam here, it’s being touched up earlier. This one here, I, we picked that up at Roderic Wells is a common problem with catamaran. It doesn’t matter what model I, when you go on a morning, if they have steel rings or something hard on the top of the moorings when there’s no wind and no tide, the boat can just drift. And the morning boys drift under the boats at times in between the house. And then of course you rise and fall on the wives and that’s where the damage is done. These steel rings can bounce and bang. So once you hear that first stump inside the boat, you a guy out like a sharp, uh, talking the morning boy firmly fixed between the house, somewhere near the bad’s where it kind of do any, any harm. okay guys, that’s all the time we have for this week. I’ve just put a new post up on the syndicated sailing site. Check out the link in the description. It describes the boat selection process for the big cats syndicate. It’s proving to be a real adventure before we even get to sail the boat. Also, keep an eye open for the live lucky fish launching next week. Maybe your comment and guesses about that. Who that new girl crew Mike be? And it’s always a huge thanks to our patrons by everybody. We got throat. Leah, you are a champ. Hi. Five leave your comments and guesses maybe or comments. Yeah, yeah. Good bye. It makes it easy. You’re right. We just leave it to you. Leave your guesses. I know who she is. You know who just wave. Okay. Be nice. Could be good boy. Why is it huge thanks to our patrons. See you all next week. Thanks everyone. Bye. All right, one more time. Okay, let’s do it. Let them go for it and we’ll just laugh. I got guys, it’s all the time. Okay. Ever striking that child daddy’s head. Alright. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel if you haven’t already, and thank you for watching..

    Tackling the Mighty Mississippi | Sailing Soulianis – Ep. 28
    Articles, Blog

    Tackling the Mighty Mississippi | Sailing Soulianis – Ep. 28

    January 11, 2020


    – Hey guys, if you’re new to our journey, here’s a quick recap
    to get you up to speed. After buying our Tartan
    37 in Racine, Wisconsin, we sailed it around Lake Michigan, then started making preparations to head south to salt water. We decided to take our
    boat to the Gulf of Mexico via the Inland River System, which is made up of
    several rivers and canals, including part of the Mississippi. We unstepped the mast to clear a bunch of low fixed
    bridges along the route. We then prepared the
    mast for shipping south via truck and will put it back
    up when we reach the gulf. Now for the duration of
    our trip down the river, we won’t be sailing, but
    rather motoring Soulianis. Right now, you’ve joined
    us in Grafton, Illinois about 300 miles into
    our 1,300 mile journey from Chicago to Mobile, Alabama. We’re gonna go see a tugboat. It’s actually tow, but they
    call it a tugboat tour. – [Kirk] No, I called it a tugboat tour. – No, it says tugboat
    tour on the pamphlet. – [Kirk] Oh. – Yeah. We know better (laughs). A towboat has a flat
    bow for pushing barges. A tugboat has a pointy bow, is much more maneuverable, and can push or pull a
    larger ship in any direction. (laughs) – Welcome to the Twyla Luhr where a twin screw, 6,800 horsepower boat. This is where the navigation
    in the vessel takes place. I’ve got two radars, my main radar and I also
    have two Zeon searchlights. The Zeon lights can pick up a buoy up to two-to-three
    miles away on a dark night. It’s a long white beam
    that can be reduced down to about a foot in diameter. From the bottom of the boat, the bottom of the bow of the boat to the river bottom is 9.2 feet deep, so actually the boat’s drawn 9-foot, so it’s about 18-foot deep right here. The electronic chart identifies and tracks other vessels in the area. It shows the direction they’re traveling, their destination, the speed. It’s very helpful. It does a lot of other stuff too. Alright. (horn blows) Alright (laughs). There you go. – [Kirk] What do you think? – That was pretty cool. – [Kirk] Yeah. – I wish we would of got that on camera. – [Kirk] I shot some of that. – No, when she was like, so what did you do all before all these computers and stuff like that? – [Kirk] Oh, yeah. – Looked out the window. (laughs) – The fuel capacity on this
    boat, 57,000 gallons. – [Kirk] Wow. – Wait, I don’t understand. – So that’s the most that they’ve ever filled up at one time. – Oh. – [Kirk] But it will hold 236,000. Oh, he’s got a treadmill. All the spares, wow. Oh, they can do laundry. – [Lauren] Oh yeah. – [Kirk] This is their oil. (laughs) 140 degrees. Oh my God. Could you imagine working like that? – I don’t even know how like (whispers). – We’ll tow anywhere from 25-30 south, but we could bring 36 back. – [Kirk] So you do six wide by six long? – Yes. – [Kirk] Wow. – [Woman] Hey brother, how many days in a row do you guys work? – We work 28, get off the boat 14. (Birds chirping) – [Lauren] In Grafton, there’s
    a winery on top of a hill. Climbing up to it is a thing to do, especially for us boaters who could really use a leg workout. – [Kirk] It’s not 50, it’s warmer. – Is it? – [Kirk] Yeah. It’s supposed to get to like 69 today. – [Lauren] It was morning though
    and the winery wasn’t open. That was just fine. We were on a mission
    to see the fall colors. (Birds chirping) (Birds chirping) – [Kirk] This is probably
    gonna be our best colors, huh? – Yeah, it’s crazy ’cause
    there’s techno lime like set back against, look at that. Do you see that blue-green
    moss over there? – [Kirk] Yeah. – [Lauren] On that tree? Everything’s a little bit wet, so all the bark is really dark
    and setting those colors off. – [Kirk] Screw the fall colors. I want to look at your hair. (laughs) – [Lauren] She’s the only one there. – [Kirk] We planned to stay in Grafton for a couple of days
    to get some work done, but we ended up staying
    there almost a week. We checked off a lot of
    things on our to-do list, including laundry, a provisioning run, computer work, and more
    engine maintenance. The engine was due for an oil change, and we needed to change
    the primary fuel filter. This was our first time
    tackling these tasks, and as always, it takes
    longer than it should. Fortunately, everything
    went pretty smoothly. Lauren got some time to do yoga and take a couple of runs along the river. – All those beautiful colors and the Mississippi. – [Kirk] And we spent an evening checking out Grafton’s nightlife. This multilevel bar called Third Chute appeared to be the hot spot in town. (loud noises!) – [Lauren] And now begins our journey down the Mississippi. With its swift four-knot
    current running in our favor, we planned to cover the 218
    miles in just a couple days. Just 15 miles downriver lies
    the town of Alton, Illinois. It’s home to the last
    floating riverboat casino that’s still in operation
    on the Mississippi, and the flour mill that produces up to two-and-a-quarter million pounds of flour per day. – [Kirk] Are we going past Alton? – [Lauren] Yeah, we just passed it. – [Kirk] I thought you had it turned on. – [Lauren] No. – [Kirk] Whoops. (laughs) We didn’t get it. Just downriver from Alton, we entered The Chain of Rocks Canal. We’re in a canal, that’s all (laughs). This eight-and-a-half mile long canal was built to bypass a rock-filled section of river just north of St. Louis, which is unnavigable at low water and dangerous at best at high water. – Nine nine. – [Kirk] Nine nine? – Nine nine. – [Kirk] What? – [Lauren] Yeah, woo! – [Kirk] After the one-to-two knots we had on the Illinois River, it felt like we were flying
    down the Mississippi. – Kirk, that was probably the first time that chart plotter has ever
    displayed double digits. (laughs) Oh, now we’re down to nine six. – [Kirk] Bummer. – [Kirk] That’s what I said. It’s a nice city to watch
    and wave as it goes past. – [Lauren] The cruising guide
    said this almost verbatim, not only because of the swift current, but also because there is literally no place to stop in St. Louis with a boat. No docks, no marinas, no
    anchorages, no nothin’. – We were in Grafton this morning. It’s still morning, and
    we’re now in St. Louis. We’ve already done 40 miles. I guess that’s what happens
    when you can do 10 knots. – See that barge being
    lifted out of the water? – [Kirk] Oh wow. – [Lauren] Yeah. – [Kirk] What do you think about St. Louie? – It would probably be a lot cooler if this embarkment parking lot actually had a some sort
    of riverfront happening. – [Kirk] Yeah. – But yeah. I can see that there is
    literally nowhere to stop. – [Kirk] He’s a cute little guy! – [Lauren] That night we stopped
    at Hoppies Marine Services, which is billed as the only fuel stop for the next 107 miles, and the only marina for the next 227. It also had a bathroom
    straight out of a horror movie. The next morning we woke up to a wee bit of fog on the river. – I got the radar up and running. The radar is pretty cool. – [Lauren] Yeah? – Yeah. I can see a lot. – [Lauren] We just have never
    turned it on before, right? – Well, I mean I’ve turned it on, but I never actually tried to use it. I can see the buoys. I can see the little weir dam things. – [Lauren] Oh really? – Yeah. – [Lauren] Look at this! Hear that? It’s the radar. We couldn’t hear it, but
    the camera picked it up. We had quite the fender set up at Hoppies because it was basically
    just a barge floating along the side of the river, so we were completely exposed
    to all the tows and currents, the wind and everything, so we were banging up against
    the dock pretty hard and yeah. We had six fenders on one side (laughs), so you’re not supposed to travel in fog. It’s not really completely foggy. – No, but if it gets much foggier though, it’s gonna be pretty sketchy. – We’re trying to make 110 miles today, and to do so. – We only have 10-1/2 hours of sunlight. – And it’s supposed to take us in optimum conditions
    of three or four knots of current 10-1/2 hours (laughs). So we had to leave a
    little bit before sunrise to try to arrive so we
    had enough time to anchor… in the light. Any other notes? – Uh, it’s very cold. Poor guy needs some mittens. – Need some mittens for sure. – Big wooly mittens. Better yet, just bring a
    couple of sheep, I think. Two lambs. He could one lamb in each arm. – It has to stick out of the water. So that’s a buoy we just passed. That’s a buoy we just passed, That is this buoy coming right up here, and that’s obviously our riverbanks. You can see the little weir
    dams and stuff on the side. So this one right here
    is that one over there. It’s helpful. We just crossed 156. We’ve already done two miles this morning. We’ve only got 108 to go. (laughs) – [Kirk] I don’t know if I
    want to go in here Love. – [Lauren] Where does
    the river go from here? Does it curve or does it stay straight? – [Kirk] It curves, but we’re like right on curves. We’re goin’ right into the sun. If we were going to the
    side, it would be okay. – [Lauren] Shit, that is some thick fog. – [Kirk] Yeah. I’m turnin’ around. – [Lauren] What do you want to do? – [Lauren] Are we droppin’ anchor? – [Lauren] I can sit up on the bow. – [Kirk] Yeah, go up on the bow. Keep an eye out for
    big sticks and stuff too. – Okay. This is a little sketchy, but I can still actually see a good 200 feet in front of me so once I go sit on that bow pulpit and make it stop banging around, I should be able to hear more. (banging) We made it! (laughs) – Today’s been our longest day. We’ve done 75-1/2 miles already, and we’ve got another 35 to go before we hit our anchorage tonight, and we have probably seen
    more tows and barges today than we have seen at any other
    part of the river combined. There’s just one after another, and this is gonna be a really
    wild ride through here. These guys are turnin’ up a ton of water. It’s gonna be bumpy for awhile. (loud tow boat engine noise) (engine noise) I thought yesterday with 10 was fast. (laughs) – [Lauren] Our anchorage for the night was called Little Diversion Channel. The entrance was a bit narrow, and a few logs seemed to
    be stuck in the middle, which made us wonder what the shoaling was
    like under the surface. – Yeah, I’m like almost
    dizzy looking upriver. (laughs) It’s kind of crazy. Do you think I want to be on the upriver part or the downriver part? – [Lauren] Oh, it’s pretty in there. I would try to go up. – [Kirk] Above it? – [Lauren] Yeah. Oh, there’s a railroad bridge. – It’s still 30-feet deep here. – [Lauren] There would be no nosing in with the swift current. We knew we had to pick an
    entrance point and go for it, otherwise, as soon as we turned
    broadside to the current, it would take us right
    into the bank downriver. It’s just swirling in the current. – [Kirk] Yeah. Alright.=[Lauren] Where does the shoaling happen? – [Kirk] I think the shoal
    happens right up there. – [Lauren] Oh, ’cause it was on the descending bank at Big Blue Island. – [Kirk] Alright, well I’m
    gonna go right above it. – [Lauren] I think you can. (Engine revving) Perfect! – [Kirk] Cool. – [Lauren] Yeah! – [Kirk] I feel pretty good about this. – [Lauren] Yeah. It’s super peaceful.
    – The only thing is it’s gonna be cold. – I know. You can hear the crickets (whispers). (chirping) – [Kirk] I don’t think we need to go very far up here, do you? – No. I think it was just saying you could go all the way to
    the bridge if you wanted. – [Kirk] Yeah. – [Lauren] Kirk! – Yeah? – [Lauren] Look at the size of that barge. – [Kirk] Yeah, it is
    seven wide and eight long. – [Lauren] Holy crap. They’re all empty though, don’t you think? – [Kirk] Yeah. But still. – [Lauren] Yeah. – That is insane! Look at that thing (whispers). God (whispers). – [Lauren] It still doesn’t
    look that big in the camera. That’s a six-foot wave. – [Kirk] Yeah. – So this is our second night
    in anchoring on the river. Kirk’s down below right
    now putting a rubber mat in the chain locker that
    we just got from Home Depot so that we protect the inside of our fiberglass of the chain locker from the 200 feet of
    chain that we just bought. Yes? – Will you drop the first
    few bits of chain into there? – [Lauren] Yeah. – And actually, before you do
    that we should set the anchor. – Okay, back up. – I can’t. I’m stuck against the, what is that thing called? – Binnacle. – Binnacle. – Maybe we can stand. So we’ve been kind of dreading
    this part of the trip. – Yeah. – And it hasn’t been that bad. – No, it’s sort of been the best part. – Yeah, it really has. – It’s been really pretty. Everything south of St.
    Louis has been really cool. – Yeah. – I mean even Grafton was cool, but yeah, it’s like really wild feeling, whereas as like the Illinois felt like a bunch of farmland
    and like agriculture. This feels like wild. – Yeah, and industrial. There’s so many barges.
    – There’s yeah. – [Kirk] There’s nothin’ here. – Did we get any of that? I mean besides not getting showers which. – Yeah, and being freezing, sleeping in 29-degree weather. Um, I want to fill the fuel tank. – Aah! – With the next fuel can. – With the next Jerrycan? – [Kirk] Yeah. – Look at that! Wow! – Wow. Oh, I think this is
    where it’s going to get worse. – [Lauren] Oh.