Browsing Tag: sailboat living

    Sailing the Densest Archipelago in the Mediterranean: Full time Liveaboard Travel
    Articles, Blog

    Sailing the Densest Archipelago in the Mediterranean: Full time Liveaboard Travel

    December 10, 2019


    Croatia. Having over 1,000 islands is
    regarded by many as one of the best places on earth for sailing. Exploring
    Croatian in the winter means tranquil solitude on the water, but that comes at
    a cost of extreme winter weather. In this episode, together we will brave over 60
    nautical miles across the eternally transient Adriatic Sea. We’re anchored just off of Dugi Otok. It’s an island in Croatia. We’re anchored just outside of this small village of
    Luka. This is our second day here. We’re in the middle of a storm. There hasn’t
    been really much rain at all but the wind has been geting up to 30-32
    knots coming from the South, pretty intense so we’re just sitting here on
    anchor. It’s been a nice anchor all things considered. We’re nice and
    protected in this Bay so we’re not getting hit with any waves. We’re just
    getting blown around a lot. It’s kind of like being in a log cabin in the woods
    during a snowstorm you just hang out inside crank up the fire. We’re now close to 96 hours since we’ve touched land. After two days on anchor here weathering
    the storm the weather has cleared up. The wind is now coming out of the opposite
    direction it’s coming out of the north and we are going to head out of here
    sail through the National Park and then go find an anchorage because it looks
    like this evening and tomorrow we’ll have heavy weather again and it looks
    like we should be clear for the day. We are headed through this channel into Kornati National Park. We marveled as we peacefully sailed
    through this natural wonder. Kornati National Park boundaries stretch near 19 nautical
    miles enclosing 89 islands. The Kornati Archipelago is the densest group of
    islands in the whole of the Mediterranean. We set the main and headed east
    northeast towards our next anchorage just off the island of Posma. The rain is coming. We have about two miles. We might get wet. On arrival we found
    some open moorings which we gladly tied off to. The sound went dead on this clip so
    let me explain what I’m explaining. We dropped the sails and we turned on the
    engine to motor into the bay. Wind picked up to over 20 knots and it
    began to rain. As we were headed full bore into the bay
    I found the throttle was more attached to my hand than it was the throttle.
    The screw that held it in place had sheared. Thinking and moving fast we were
    able to wedge a screw into the shaft. Now we don’t have another exact screw so we
    have a temporary fix that works although the throttle has some wiggle room. Open the clutch to let the mainsheet run
    free. Alright, that feels good. It feels like we just picked up some speed. We’re sailing! Five knots. Five knots? Five and a half. Almost six. Seven knots. Six and a half, seven knots. Heavy weather sailing no doubt about
    that. We did nineteen point nine nautical miles in three hours and 45 minutes. This
    first experience with that much wind. In Croatia you have short fetch so the waves
    don’t have a long distance to develop so you get these steep waves that are
    really close together so you would get just get tossed around a lot. That was intense. That was awesome! We just went through a
    really intense windy storm, probably about 35 knots and just super
    wavy. We got splashed in the face a bunch of times and I think we were the
    only sailboat out there. It was absolutely incredible, just such a fun
    ride. A good day. We’re all dry. We kept dry with our heavy weather gear so now the
    only thing left to do is to… start a fire. That one’s a little green. *laughter* It’s about nine thirty seven. Last night
    we anchored off of the island of Kaprije. We are sailing to Sibenik today and
    that is an inlet. It’s kind of like a lake almost and then we’ll be
    anchoring in fresh water in a freshwater lake. It’s a 15-mile sail
    should take three hours. Wind is blowing about 10 to 15 knots out of the
    Northeast so we’ll have to beat windward. We’ll only have to do that one tack that
    we already did. We’ll take this pretty much all the way less than a mile to the
    entrance of Sibenik then from there we’ll drop the sails and motor. After eight days on Arianrhod we were
    elated to see the city of Sibenik. As you’re making way into Sibenik, you
    can see a few of these tunnels which were built by the Yugoslav army this one
    specifically is referred to as Hitler’s Eye. We are in Sibenik just got fuel
    somewhere around four hundred four hundred and fifteen dollars but we’re
    full on diesel full on petrol. We’re gonna move the boat back, leave the boat,
    go do some laundry, get some food provision. As soon as we start going up
    here we should hit fresh water and so then we’ll be boating in fresh water
    which will be a absolute first for Arianrhod, I think. I don’t think, I don’t
    know if Andre’s been here. Not sure. Thank you for watching and subscribe to join us next
    time as we make our way through the fresh water up to the quaint town of
    Skradin. Big Love.

    How do you dump trash on a sailboat? Sailing Q&A 18
    Articles, Blog

    How do you dump trash on a sailboat? Sailing Q&A 18

    December 9, 2019


    Hello and welcome to your questions, in
    which we take one of your questions and we answer it for about five minutes or so.
    And I think this one is going to divide the audience. And I think having had a
    quick discussion with Liz about this it’s going to divide us as well! So
    the question is, and we get asked this quite a lot, is what do we do with our
    rubbish whilst we live on our boat? It’s a big question because of course it does
    open up lots of discussions about the environment and rubbish disposal and so
    on. I guess we should start with just describing what we do. Basically
    anything that you can eat, and anything that’s organic goes over, and it goes over whether we’re at anchor or in the middle of the
    ocean. So if it’s completely biodegradable basically if it’s biological, it goes over
    the side. A couple of months ago we did a video which we entitled “Living
    like Robinson Crusoe” and in that video we went on to show how we picked up rubbish.
    And it opened up a huge debate about what we should be doing with this
    rubbish. A lot of people suggested that we can burn the rubbish. I think the
    the point to make is that the rubbish we picked up was all
    plastic. It was plastic specifically that we picked up. Having said that, people
    are suggesting that you can burn plastic. Now when we came to Tioman, which is
    where we are now, we came via a little island called Tinggi and we had four or
    five bags of rubbish, and it wouldn’t have been fair to have taken
    that rubbish ashore there, because it has a population of about 1,500 people… so
    what would they do with it? They’d probably burn it. In Tioman we were happy to see
    that they have recycle bins with little signs that say “recycle your rubbish”, and
    you can divide up your tin cans and your plastic bottles. The only thing is
    that every night as we sit here in anchor we can smell burning plastic. It’s all
    burning ashore. And, of course, probably most of you know that burning plastic
    releases dioxins into the atmosphere. Carcinogens, toxins… yeah they can be
    extremely harmful to ourselves and to the environment and
    to the atmosphere. And I mean even the the professionals out there are divided
    about whether it is actually effective to incinerate. so the argument is that if
    you incinerate at high enough temperatures, and you filter the smoke
    that comes out of the incinerator, then you control those dioxins. But some
    people aren’t necessarily in agreement with that either. So you know, should we
    be burning plastic when we go ashore to help the Islanders not have to do it for
    us? Because that essentially seems to be what happens. We carefully package
    it all up give, it to them to be recycled and it gets burnt anyway! And that’s
    actually getting us nowhere at all. We know of a lot of yachties, and we’ll
    admit that we did it ourselves, a lot of yachties will throw tin cans over the
    side. Now aluminium beer cans, there’s a
    special way that if you rip it and you throw it in the water in such a way, it’s
    guaranteed to sink. So a lot of yachties do this. And I know we used to do it as
    well… then we got told off didn’t we? We got told off! There’s a couple of
    reasons for that. The first thing is that aluminium cans are actually lined with a
    plastic, to not only hold in the ink on the outside and the labeling, but also
    inside it actually acts as a kind of preservative. That obviously takes a
    while to break down. Do you know how long it takes it an aluminium can to break down? I
    don’t know, tell me Jamie! 200 years. For a… an aluminium can. A
    tin can is 50 years. Okay, so when we’re talking tin can we mean a tin can that
    you keep your peas and your baked beans in. Yes. All right, but the drinking
    cans for Coca Cola, Fanta and all that crap, they’ve got plastic in them?
    So what we were arguing about just now was… While I agree with you on the plastic
    coated soda cans: Yeah they should go. But the tin cans that we
    keep our vegetables in, I don’t have a problem with throwing those over when
    we’re quite a way out, when you’ve got a mile of sea beneath you. Hey, isn’t that
    just kind of again the whole out-of-sight out-of-mind thing? You know,
    it’s not my problem if I dump it over the side and it sinks to the bottom a
    mile in the ocean. If it was carcinogenic, if it had toxins, if someone would
    tell me that by doing that I’m actually releasing toxins into the water which
    are gonna hurt the animals, then I would rethink it. I haven’t found that
    information anywhere, but as far as I understand you’re just putting tin back
    into the earth. And my biggest, the BIGGEST thing that pisses me off
    generally about recycling and generally getting rid of rubbish, is that this
    earth is 7/10 ocean. Only 30% of the earth is covered in land, so why do we
    think that it’s OK to shove everything on the land in landfills, or
    whatever it is we do with it, and the other 70% is is so pristine we mustn’t
    put even one tin can in it. For me, a tin can in the middle of a very deep ocean
    if it’s not causing any harm is no worse than putting it in a landfill. OK, yeah I
    get your argument. I I think at this point I’m just going to put a little
    overlay over this discussion now, and show you some photographs of aluminium
    beer cans that have collected. Now I assume this is in shallow water, so these
    are in anchorages. So you can imagine an anchorage with a whole load of boats , they
    were all having a party and they chucked their tin cans over the side. And you
    shouldn’t do that. Definitely you shouldn’t put anything in the harbour or
    where you’re anchored, nothing except for foodstuffs. Nothing else goes in there
    because it will just rest there. When you’ve got a mile of ocean beneath you,
    okay well it will rest at the bottom but it will gradually disintegrate and it
    will eventually go to back to tin into its elements. As long as it
    doesn’t cause harm to the animals… and I do know that some environmentalists say
    that some things, for instance glass or things that are not not harmful, will act
    as little homes for some great sea creatures. So you know I think we’ve got
    to be very careful about what we do and we don’t throw over the side, and what we
    do and don’t put in the earth, it’s the same thing. Glass is an interesting one, because we attempted to smash the glass on the bow of the boat to break it up. It’s a
    bit dangerous though because you get glass splinters all over the deck. So do
    you then just fill up the glass from the tap, fill it up and throw it over the
    side for it to sink to the bottom? I haven’t got a problem with glass going into the ocean,
    again it needs to be a way out, because when I was little I used to collect the
    glass, the bits of glass that used to end up on the beach and have been rolled
    in the surf. They’ve got that gorgeous lovely texture, all rounded and pretty, and lots
    of different colors. We used to get them all over the beaches in the UK, you just
    don’t see little bits of glass anymore. And that’s because we’re all using…
    PLASTIC! Did you know, glass though, they can’t actually even decide how long
    it takes to break down when it’s smashed up. Of course it gets ground down, but a
    whole glass bottle if it were to sink to the bottom of the ocean takes so long
    to decompose they actually don’t know how long it takes. Some people reckon it
    takes a million years. But why is that a problem though?
    Look at a glass bottle that’s not producing any kind of dioxins, it’s
    perhaps giving a few sea creatures a home, perhaps it’s going in a little bit
    shallower and helping to form part of the coral…
    Isn’t glass made from sand in the first place? Here’s some other interesting
    facts, just on decomposition: so cigarette butts between one to five
    years; tin cans 50 years; aluminum cans 200 years; plastic beverage holders, now
    these things are evil, these things, you know they’re when you get a six-pack
    of beer, they take 400 years. 400 years to
    decompose! Now plastic does decompose in the water, let’s get
    our facts right, it will decompose, but if it takes 400 years to decompose that
    thing’s floating around in the ocean and we’ve all seen photographs of turtles
    and dolphins and marine animals that either swallow these things or they
    get caught up in them. It’s all coming back to plastic. Yeah, it all comes back
    to plastic. And the problem with this bloody planet, and the human beings on it,
    is that we seem to love plastic. And the manufacturers can’t stop making
    plastic CRAP. There’s too much plastic on it. Just stop making plastic now, just
    stop it. When I grew up, your milk came in a milk bottle, and it was delivered and
    then the next day the bloke would come back (the milkman), he’d take the bottle
    away, wash it out, and then bring it back again. Actually we do see that, we have
    seen that. In places like Turkey you could recycle your beer bottles, and in
    here they do a lot of that kind of recycling as well. You used to get a penny
    back didn’t you, when you took your bottles back to the shop. This
    is all very well, but this doesn’t help us. As yachties, what do we do? I
    think the only thing that we can do as yachties is to try and minimize the
    amount of plastic that we buy in the first place. Absolutely. And that’s
    from going to the supermarket and taking your hessian, recycled shopping bags – trying to avoid… and of course the other thing when you go
    into shop, and they immediately put all your gear in plastic bags. In the UK now
    I think they’re obliged to ask whether you want plastic bags, and they charge
    you for bags. They don’t do that in some of these countries, so it’s up to you as
    the person buying this gear to take… yeah, take your shopping
    bag with you. That is all we can do… We can do better, I mean only today I was
    desperately thirsty and I bought a plastic bottle full of water, so that
    will go into the rubbish, and it’ll go onto the island to possibly get burnt tonight.
    So really places like Lipe in Thailand, they provide you with a
    stainless steel container and they have little spots all around the island where
    you can just fill up with water. They’re trying to stop plastic bottles
    and it’s great. There are lots of initiatives around the world, there’s no
    point in getting too upset because there are loads of initiatives. We should just
    mention that Liz is talking about TRASH HEROES, and this is a nonprofit
    organization set up by both tourists and the local people on Koh Lipe. And they
    now have lots and lots of different factions around, not just Thailand, but in
    Malaysia and Indonesia as well, and these guys are doing a great job. The sad thing
    is is that it’s from the bottom, it’s done from the bottom up, you know. There’s
    no government incentive. It seems as if there is no government incentive from
    the top down to incentivize people to not buy plastic. So there we go.
    Interesting discussion. Let us know what you think in the comments below. Don’t
    forget to hit that subscribe button, and if you think this is an interesting
    discussion then please do share it across your social media. Yes, please do
    let’s generate a whole load of thinking on this subject, and let’s do it on
    Facebook and Instagram… We do all of those, so chuck it on there let’s get it out
    there. Let’s see what people have to say. In the meantime… Peace, and fair winds.

    How We Spent over $16,000 in the Boat Yard
    Articles, Blog

    How We Spent over $16,000 in the Boat Yard

    December 8, 2019


    Recently we encountered a problem that
    was initially to take two to three weeks and around 2000 euros to fix. In
    reality it cost around four and a half months and over 16 thousand euros. This is
    the story of our nightmare haul out. This is a situation that I don’t
    completely understand and I’m not sure how much of it is my own ignorance, lost
    in translation, laziness, happenstance or actual malice,
    but to quote to Napoleon Bonaparte “I want to never ascribe to malice that
    which is adequately explained by incompetence”, and Tim Ferriss added, “or
    busyness”, and I would like to add or laziness. Never ascribe to malice that
    which is adequately explained by incompetence, busyness or laziness. That
    being said I’d like to lay out this situation as objectively as I possibly
    can in the hopes that we might all learn something. To set the stage the three of
    us set out from Spain close to 10 months ago. As to be expected from life as we
    were moving forward we encountered many obstacles that together we overcame.
    Mistakes were made and lessons were learned but entering into Croatia we see
    the first signs of real trouble. The other day we lost reverse gear. Went to
    put it in gear and it wasn’t there. Scavenger Jack signing out. Jackson had to
    catch his flight to North America to finish his degree in filmmaking
    while Tara and I head north towards Pula Croatia where we are scheduled to film with Made On The Road UK and have a Balkan campervan scheduled for rental to
    explore Croatia. We made a stop on the island of Mali Losinj where friends of
    Alessandro came and diagnosed the problem with the gearbox.
    These are lamella. They allow you to shift into forward, into neutral, and into
    reverse by gripping and not gripping the gears. The ones in this gearbox…It’s like a polish you know and that’s enough that under the pressure he don’t have a grip to make good connection
    for the reverse. We were told we should prepare for a rebuild of the
    transmission. Not having reverse is a big problem, but it’s not the end of
    the world because we could still move forward so we continued north to our
    obligations in Pula. This is where it starts to get weird.
    We contacted Ad Maris in Marina Veruda in Pula, Croatia. Patrick came to the boat
    and told us that it would greatly reduce the cost of time, labor, and headache to
    have the whole engine removed rather than struggle in the cramped engine bay
    with a big heavy gearbox for hours BUT this would necessitate a haul out.
    Initially we thought this idea was absurd but then we came to the
    conclusion that if we could spend a few weeks on land we could make some needed
    repairs and upgrades to Arianrhod now instead of the original plan was at some
    point in the distant future to have a haul out in Tunisia Africa, which is
    where Martin recommended. We also had a van for a week so this meant that we
    could leave Arianrhod on land in a safe secure location while we explored
    Croatia. The idea was beginning to look all right. The next morning, as we were
    making breakfast, Patrick called and 45 minutes later he and this boat
    arrived and they were ready to take us to the crane for a haul out. The pressure
    of this sales tactic is intense. We agreed to the haul out. This is
    turning out to be an eventful day. Within two hours Arianrhod was out
    of the water and the engine was completely detached and she was prepped
    for open engine surgery. The following day Adis, Patrick’s boss, and his crew
    arrived and we commenced the engine removal. Before noon her old battered, but still
    solid heart was removed and the gearbox was on its way for inspection. It was
    also determined that we needed a new clutch and that the parts would be
    difficult to find. We’ll send the gearbox to Rijeka. We will check if we can find the new part because we don’t have new parts this old. Returning to the gutted vessel slightly
    dazed we cleaned out the engine bay as best as we could. This is where the
    situation becomes really muddled. Adis. Comes and tells us that they don’t think
    that they can repair the gearbox because it’s an old engine and it’s impossible
    to find the parts and if they can find the parts it will cost around 8,000 euro
    to rebuild the gearbox and fix everything. His solution was instead of
    repairing it, it might be wiser to just shell out another five thousand euro to
    purchase a brand new Yanmar engine from him, of course, with a warranty for
    security for the years to come. We would be back on the water in three weeks and
    it would cost just over thirteen thousand euros. Now he made some good
    points. The engine is old and the parts for it can be difficult to find and
    it’s arguable whether or not a new engine is more reliable. The question
    really becomes if you plan on crossing the Atlantic and beyond, do you want an
    old repaired engine or do you want a brand new one? This was very difficult to
    hear and I turned to Reddit and I found a complete Kanzaki KH 18 gearbox in the
    USA to replace ours. It could be purchased for $1000, but
    shipping, importing, installation, all said and done it would cost near eight to
    nine thousand dollars. We also looked seriously into converting to electric as
    the dream is to one day be completely off of fossil fuels. We’re going to a
    factory to look at electric motors. But it seemed for us it was going to cost, at a minimum, of 12,000 euros. Meanwhile we asked Adis if we
    could have our gearbox returned because I wanted to see if we could find
    somebody else to fix it. We were returned a box of gears, not a gearbox. I’m still
    not sure how I feel about that. We ended up going with the Beta Marine 38 horsepower
    engine over our other seemingly less ideal options. With the decision this
    costly I was definitely not gonna let somebody pressure me into purchasing an
    engine that I was not completely on board with. We ended up flying to Morocco for two weeks because we needed a change of atmosphere. We returned and we continued on repairs
    while we waited for the new engine. We got a new Genoa. A new sail, a Genoa.
    We shredded the other one. And all the sail makers said that, “well, you could repair it, but it’ll definitely break again really soon.” Because it’s been repaired multiple times. So this one made by a professional sail maker here in Pula, Elvis. Genoa with the Sunbrella. It’s got this here to tension the foot. We removed and reinforced the davit
    plates. We extended the davits aft 30 centimeters as well as added cross
    supports all completed by Robert. I stripped roughly 20 kilograms of unused
    electrical wire and hose from Arianrhod. We saved maybe five kilograms as supplies
    and cleaned up the distribution panel. It took me two and a half days to buff Arianrhod And we completed many other smaller projects. It ended up taking
    around seven weeks for the Beta Marine engine to arrive and once we knew it was
    coming we were moved into position so the crane could access Arianrhod. This is our new engine. Wow. It’s really pretty. A quick aside we
    were never able to sell our wounded but functioning Yanmar 3qm 38 engine because
    we didn’t have papers for it. To me it seems like if you live in Western
    society specifically the European Union then you live in a society that values
    documentation over form and function and this hinders creativity and I do not
    believe that a socio-economic system that squashes individual creativity will
    endure, but I digress. Because the engine was delayed by two weeks it arrived
    three days after the workers at the marina took off for holiday. Because in
    Europe it is common for many people to take a couple months off of work in the
    winter. Adis told us that he would not help us and instead we should try to
    find somebody else to help us because he would be on holiday, but all the
    mechanics were on holiday, and so the only help that Adis actually provided was
    a number for a contact in Split. A man named Igor who we bought our Beta Marine
    engine from and then after that we never saw or heard from Adis again. I had resolved to install the engine.
    I removed the old coupling and I found that the propeller shaft was 32
    millimeters in diameter and our new coupling is made for a 30 millimeter
    propeller shaft. We need to remove the propeller shaft and turn it on a lathe
    to reduce the diameter by 2 millimeters. I do not have access to a metal shop and
    I do not have the tools to pull a propeller. Finally I contacted Robert who
    had made adjustments to our davits. He agreed to reduce the shaft, replace the
    Cutlass bearing stuffing box, seacock strainer basket, and install and align the
    engine all for 2000 euro plus materials. We thought this was a bit steep but we
    agreed as we had finally found someone to help us. So then, does this corrode? No.
    Because you have the zinc on it? Bronze doesn’t corrode. Doesn’t corrode.
    Agh, I did not know that. It’s been four months and three days and
    today we are installing a new engine. It’s like a hundred and thirty eight
    kilos which is around 60 kilos lighter than previously. Slowly down. Little bit more. Little bit. Good. Stop. Going back. Okay. Slow. Little bit down. Stop. Okay, we can proceed. Go, go, go. Stop? No, go down. Down. Down. Stop. Little bit up. Up just a little bit. Stop. Stop. So far, so good. Pull it out and cut the tube a little bit
    maybe five centimeters and cut the shaft. So, here’s the problem. This is too close. We
    have an adapter, a rubber adapter, it’s about five centimeters has to fit in
    there and there’s no space between here and this is the coupling, the
    transmission, the stuffing box. This pipe right here this through-hole we need to
    cut that and then move this stuffing box aft maybe five centimeters and then we
    have to cut the propeller shaft so that it’s the correct length and then we can
    have this space in between here the two couplings so that we will be able to
    attach on, but the alignment looks good. We need five extra centimeters here. We’re good up front. Now the back. Yes, but put away the…take them out? Yes. Okay and then now I’m going inside and you must stay up here then we pull out the motor. Forward. Yes, a little bit. Okay, stop. This we must cut. Yep. Eight
    centimeter. Eight centimeters. You’re hot. They say maybe it’s hot and it’s
    going…yeah, expanded? Yes. Without hammer, nothing. I’ll be fluent in Croatian in no time. Doran? Is that what you said? Down? No, down is dolje. See. Told you. Fluent in Croatian, no problem. Dolje. What’s up? I mean that everything will be perfect. Perfect. Yes, everything will be fine. Engine installed. Now just to do proper alignment, secure it down, and then hook it up. Should be ready to start up tomorrow.
    I think we’ll give it a test start. We installed the raw water
    cooling system and the fuel lines. Then we realized the exhaust system
    needs to be adjusted with a high-rise. That right there that’s the problem.
    Otherwise it would run the risk of water entering back into the engine and
    blowing a cylinder from the rapid expansion of the water vapor. The next
    day we added oil and coolant and we hooked up a new battery and tried to
    start the engine for the first time. Robert created a custom high-rise for
    around 200 euro. The other option was to wait four weeks and spend over 300 euro
    to get one from Igor. We installed the high-rise and tested the engine while
    supplementing fresh water for the raw water cooling system. We used a temporary
    transparent exhaust tube to be certain that all the water was straining into
    the water log. Woo! Woo-hoo! I couldn’t stand the thought of throwing
    the old Yanmar out and instead gave it to Robert. We determined it was time to
    launch Arianrhod. After four and a half months of
    bleeding money and suffering stagnation we watched in amazement as Arianrhod
    was put back in the water. As soon as we were in the water we
    started the engine and checked for leaks. Alright, starting the motor for the first water test. Ready? Ready. Stop. Give it just a little bit of throttle, Tara. What? No, no, they asked if they can put away the…crane? The crane. And then, we’re good? Yes. Water don’t come in. We were then promptly shoo’ed off the dock before we
    were settled in. We were literally being pushed off the dock and told to go find
    a slip as it was raining and the wind was blowing around ten knots. They told us
    they needed the space immediately to lift another boat, which they lifted an
    hour and a half later. Once safely in our slip Robert helped us install our
    long-awaited Cubic Mini Wood Stove. We thanked Robert for his honesty, his hard
    work, and his flexibility and then we prepared to set sail. The period from September 2018 to January 2019 was one of the most
    stressful and by far the most expensive period of my life but that’s good
    because I learned a slew of invaluable lessons. Here are three of the
    many lessons learned from our nightmare haul out. Number 1: never let anybody
    hurry you especially if you have to pay them. Slow down. Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast. That comes from the US Special Forces. Lesson Number 2: regular rest prevents
    downward spirals. Rest regularly or you will exhaust yourself and when you’re
    exhausted you will make a series of poor decisions that will begin momentum in a
    downward spiral. First, you have to halt that downward momentum before you can
    turn it around and create upward momentum. To prevent a downward spiral
    from happening in the first place regularly rest.
    Working yourself to death is not helpful for anyone. And lesson Number 3: always
    expect things to be more difficult and to take more time than you anticipate. In
    the Tao Te Ching Lao Tzu wrote something like this in Chapter 63: the sage
    expects everything to be difficult and therefore never encounters difficulty. This concludes Season One of SV Arianrhod. Season One was 13 episodes and took about
    ten months to create. It produced around a thousand dollars in revenue and costed
    over 50,000 dollars to create and that’s without me on payroll. If you enjoy these videos and would like to see more and would like to
    enable us to create more share the series with your friends. The best way to
    support the channel to support FLORB to support SV Arianrhod and Alternative
    Living Spaces is to share these series with your friends. Get more people
    excited about sailing vessel Arianrhod and Alternative Living Spaces. If you
    enjoy the videos and you have the means support FLORB on Patreon. Even if you can
    support one dollar per episode all of it helps us be able to create
    more for you. Let’s Explore Life Together. And check out this crazy Floating Orb
    that we all live on and share and call home. Big Love. See you soon.

    Articles

    How do you dump trash on a sailboat? Sailing Q&A 18

    December 7, 2019


    Hello and welcome to your questions, in
    which we take one of your questions and we answer it for about five minutes or so.
    And I think this one is going to divide the audience. And I think having had a
    quick discussion with Liz about this it’s going to divide us as well! So
    the question is, and we get asked this quite a lot, is what do we do with our
    rubbish whilst we live on our boat? It’s a big question because of course it does
    open up lots of discussions about the environment and rubbish disposal and so
    on. I guess we should start with just describing what we do. Basically
    anything that you can eat, and anything that’s organic goes over, and it goes over whether we’re at anchor or in the middle of the
    ocean. So if it’s completely biodegradable basically if it’s biological, it goes over
    the side. A couple of months ago we did a video which we entitled “Living
    like Robinson Crusoe” and in that video we went on to show how we picked up rubbish.
    And it opened up a huge debate about what we should be doing with this
    rubbish. A lot of people suggested that we can burn the rubbish. I think the
    the point to make is that the rubbish we picked up was all
    plastic. It was plastic specifically that we picked up. Having said that, people
    are suggesting that you can burn plastic. Now when we came to Tioman, which is
    where we are now, we came via a little island called Tinggi and we had four or
    five bags of rubbish, and it wouldn’t have been fair to have taken
    that rubbish ashore there, because it has a population of about 1,500 people… so
    what would they do with it? They’d probably burn it. In Tioman we were happy to see
    that they have recycle bins with little signs that say “recycle your rubbish”, and
    you can divide up your tin cans and your plastic bottles. The only thing is
    that every night as we sit here in anchor we can smell burning plastic. It’s all
    burning ashore. And, of course, probably most of you know that burning plastic
    releases dioxins into the atmosphere. Carcinogens, toxins… yeah they can be
    extremely harmful to ourselves and to the environment and
    to the atmosphere. And I mean even the the professionals out there are divided
    about whether it is actually effective to incinerate. so the argument is that if
    you incinerate at high enough temperatures, and you filter the smoke
    that comes out of the incinerator, then you control those dioxins. But some
    people aren’t necessarily in agreement with that either. So you know, should we
    be burning plastic when we go ashore to help the Islanders not have to do it for
    us? Because that essentially seems to be what happens. We carefully package
    it all up give, it to them to be recycled and it gets burnt anyway! And that’s
    actually getting us nowhere at all. We know of a lot of yachties, and we’ll
    admit that we did it ourselves, a lot of yachties will throw tin cans over the
    side. Now aluminium beer cans, there’s a
    special way that if you rip it and you throw it in the water in such a way, it’s
    guaranteed to sink. So a lot of yachties do this. And I know we used to do it as
    well… then we got told off didn’t we? We got told off! There’s a couple of
    reasons for that. The first thing is that aluminium cans are actually lined with a
    plastic, to not only hold in the ink on the outside and the labeling, but also
    inside it actually acts as a kind of preservative. That obviously takes a
    while to break down. Do you know how long it takes it an aluminium can to break down? I
    don’t know, tell me Jamie! 200 years. For a… an aluminium can. A
    tin can is 50 years. Okay, so when we’re talking tin can we mean a tin can that
    you keep your peas and your baked beans in. Yes. All right, but the drinking
    cans for Coca Cola, Fanta and all that crap, they’ve got plastic in them?
    So what we were arguing about just now was… While I agree with you on the plastic
    coated soda cans: Yeah they should go. But the tin cans that we
    keep our vegetables in, I don’t have a problem with throwing those over when
    we’re quite a way out, when you’ve got a mile of sea beneath you. Hey, isn’t that
    just kind of again the whole out-of-sight out-of-mind thing? You know,
    it’s not my problem if I dump it over the side and it sinks to the bottom a
    mile in the ocean. If it was carcinogenic, if it had toxins, if someone would
    tell me that by doing that I’m actually releasing toxins into the water which
    are gonna hurt the animals, then I would rethink it. I haven’t found that
    information anywhere, but as far as I understand you’re just putting tin back
    into the earth. And my biggest, the BIGGEST thing that pisses me off
    generally about recycling and generally getting rid of rubbish, is that this
    earth is 7/10 ocean. Only 30% of the earth is covered in land, so why do we
    think that it’s OK to shove everything on the land in landfills, or
    whatever it is we do with it, and the other 70% is is so pristine we mustn’t
    put even one tin can in it. For me, a tin can in the middle of a very deep ocean
    if it’s not causing any harm is no worse than putting it in a landfill. OK, yeah I
    get your argument. I I think at this point I’m just going to put a little
    overlay over this discussion now, and show you some photographs of aluminium
    beer cans that have collected. Now I assume this is in shallow water, so these
    are in anchorages. So you can imagine an anchorage with a whole load of boats , they
    were all having a party and they chucked their tin cans over the side. And you
    shouldn’t do that. Definitely you shouldn’t put anything in the harbour or
    where you’re anchored, nothing except for foodstuffs. Nothing else goes in there
    because it will just rest there. When you’ve got a mile of ocean beneath you,
    okay well it will rest at the bottom but it will gradually disintegrate and it
    will eventually go to back to tin into its elements. As long as it
    doesn’t cause harm to the animals… and I do know that some environmentalists say
    that some things, for instance glass or things that are not not harmful, will act
    as little homes for some great sea creatures. So you know I think we’ve got
    to be very careful about what we do and we don’t throw over the side, and what we
    do and don’t put in the earth, it’s the same thing. Glass is an interesting one, because we attempted to smash the glass on the bow of the boat to break it up. It’s a
    bit dangerous though because you get glass splinters all over the deck. So do
    you then just fill up the glass from the tap, fill it up and throw it over the
    side for it to sink to the bottom? I haven’t got a problem with glass going into the ocean,
    again it needs to be a way out, because when I was little I used to collect the
    glass, the bits of glass that used to end up on the beach and have been rolled
    in the surf. They’ve got that gorgeous lovely texture, all rounded and pretty, and lots
    of different colors. We used to get them all over the beaches in the UK, you just
    don’t see little bits of glass anymore. And that’s because we’re all using…
    PLASTIC! Did you know, glass though, they can’t actually even decide how long
    it takes to break down when it’s smashed up. Of course it gets ground down, but a
    whole glass bottle if it were to sink to the bottom of the ocean takes so long
    to decompose they actually don’t know how long it takes. Some people reckon it
    takes a million years. But why is that a problem though?
    Look at a glass bottle that’s not producing any kind of dioxins, it’s
    perhaps giving a few sea creatures a home, perhaps it’s going in a little bit
    shallower and helping to form part of the coral…
    Isn’t glass made from sand in the first place? Here’s some other interesting
    facts, just on decomposition: so cigarette butts between one to five
    years; tin cans 50 years; aluminum cans 200 years; plastic beverage holders, now
    these things are evil, these things, you know they’re when you get a six-pack
    of beer, they take 400 years. 400 years to
    decompose! Now plastic does decompose in the water, let’s get
    our facts right, it will decompose, but if it takes 400 years to decompose that
    thing’s floating around in the ocean and we’ve all seen photographs of turtles
    and dolphins and marine animals that either swallow these things or they
    get caught up in them. It’s all coming back to plastic. Yeah, it all comes back
    to plastic. And the problem with this bloody planet, and the human beings on it,
    is that we seem to love plastic. And the manufacturers can’t stop making
    plastic CRAP. There’s too much plastic on it. Just stop making plastic now, just
    stop it. When I grew up, your milk came in a milk bottle, and it was delivered and
    then the next day the bloke would come back (the milkman), he’d take the bottle
    away, wash it out, and then bring it back again. Actually we do see that, we have
    seen that. In places like Turkey you could recycle your beer bottles, and in
    here they do a lot of that kind of recycling as well. You used to get a penny
    back didn’t you, when you took your bottles back to the shop. This
    is all very well, but this doesn’t help us. As yachties, what do we do? I
    think the only thing that we can do as yachties is to try and minimize the
    amount of plastic that we buy in the first place. Absolutely. And that’s
    from going to the supermarket and taking your hessian, recycled shopping bags – trying to avoid… and of course the other thing when you go
    into shop, and they immediately put all your gear in plastic bags. In the UK now
    I think they’re obliged to ask whether you want plastic bags, and they charge
    you for bags. They don’t do that in some of these countries, so it’s up to you as
    the person buying this gear to take… yeah, take your shopping
    bag with you. That is all we can do… We can do better, I mean only today I was
    desperately thirsty and I bought a plastic bottle full of water, so that
    will go into the rubbish, and it’ll go onto the island to possibly get burnt tonight.
    So really places like Lipe in Thailand, they provide you with a
    stainless steel container and they have little spots all around the island where
    you can just fill up with water. They’re trying to stop plastic bottles
    and it’s great. There are lots of initiatives around the world, there’s no
    point in getting too upset because there are loads of initiatives. We should just
    mention that Liz is talking about TRASH HEROES, and this is a nonprofit
    organization set up by both tourists and the local people on Koh Lipe. And they
    now have lots and lots of different factions around, not just Thailand, but in
    Malaysia and Indonesia as well, and these guys are doing a great job. The sad thing
    is is that it’s from the bottom, it’s done from the bottom up, you know. There’s
    no government incentive. It seems as if there is no government incentive from
    the top down to incentivize people to not buy plastic. So there we go.
    Interesting discussion. Let us know what you think in the comments below. Don’t
    forget to hit that subscribe button, and if you think this is an interesting
    discussion then please do share it across your social media. Yes, please do
    let’s generate a whole load of thinking on this subject, and let’s do it on
    Facebook and Instagram… We do all of those, so chuck it on there let’s get it out
    there. Let’s see what people have to say. In the meantime… Peace, and fair winds.

    SailAway 83 | A Capsized Freighter and Sleeping In A Boat Sling | Sailing Around The World
    Articles, Blog

    SailAway 83 | A Capsized Freighter and Sleeping In A Boat Sling | Sailing Around The World

    November 21, 2019


    this week on sale away we visit the
    famous reef freighter golden ray the Coast Guard puts on an impromptu
    demonstration just for us and we settle Cecilia into the boat yard for some
    much-needed love with me last week we showed you our
    installation of nearly a thousand watts of solar power on our Stern Arch and we
    show you one of my solo gigs at tip C’s in downtown Brunswick now with only a
    few weeks until our departure for the Caribbean we head out on a little voyage
    to check off one of the last big boxes on our to-do list
    good morning mate what are you looking at that’s our shove off breakfast so
    where we headed today the belly belt what he means by the belly belt I’ve
    been explaining to him that we are taking Cecilia down to st. Mary’s
    boatyard today to get her hauled out basically get the bottom completely
    stripped and repainted we’re going to Trinidad Sr in the boat but here’s the
    fun part we had so much going on this fall to get ready to leave that it was
    hard for me to do but I finally gave up on doing but bottom ourselves because we
    have two weddings to go to and the Annapolis Boat Show so we are sailing
    down to st. Mary’s so then tomorrow morning we haul out first thing we’re
    going to sleep in the slings tonight just so we can get in the lift at high
    tide then we get in our car we head to Virginia check into a hotel room that’s
    about an hour from Annapolis go to the boat you have boat show on Thursday then
    we get up on Friday for a wedding on Laurens side her cousin and then on
    Saturday we get up in the morning and drive to Ohio for my for my nephew’s way
    you’re gonna see Nonna and Grandpa right away we’re going to see them in Virginia
    so then we’ll be in for a couple days and then we’re driving
    back on Tuesday and picking up the boat launching on Wednesday bringing it back
    here we might actually anchor out at
    Cumberland Island a couple days on the way back just to kind of relax a little
    bit all right let’s get this motor run and make sure it you know does that we’re not leavin we’re just getting the
    motor warmed up and it started so that’s uh it’s always positive sign that means
    it’s got water circulating through it so it’ll stay cool
    maybe that’s watching you see the water flow down
    just gotta do a little cleanup out here once Lauren gets it back tidy up down
    below and head out so hopefully I took a walk with the dog so I think
    everything’s done we’ll see once we get out there let’s blow this joint yeah you
    always find me here the word since that I’ve disappeared
    we know just where to you know just where you
    you’ll have a heart of gold I look forward to growing because I’ll be old
    with you I’ll be old you with the time look you in the eyes and
    say let me down that’s who you are now whines man I saw you finished what that
    must be too I do I do I do plant a garden in the summertime you flowers
    rain or shine just because I can just because I can Oh how do I do I do I do I do I do I do Oh Susan coming away
    Susak come on away tonight awaits the day now I write the time look
    you in the eyes and say thanks today airplane check out some be up outside with the
    crane boys okay I’ll bear a little bit
    aw come again yeah better Corphish design feed
    forever by the happy feet and six degrees at time
    it’s a very popular stretch the bridge will be our first bridge on
    the ICW with this boat and so you know it’s always just a little nerve-racking
    except our master 63 at high tide this bridge should be 55
    almost at low tide it’s about eleven and those – now
    so we should be all right but make sure let’s add this boat for five months I’m
    like so we’re still doing new things every day basically testing it here’s
    here’s another test all right thinking the 66
    can I go through it real slow we’re at 63 so this should be three feet it’s nice and calm this is the only
    bridge we’ve got it’s reading 68 yeah let’s hope never
    heard anything no you are masters actually 63 they make
    great many of these over tall masts our sale is not in the track looks like a top darrell thriller right
    now when I came out I was like
    it’s gonna light it was flying so nice all right well that was a short-lived
    sale concerning how did it pop out of the track you see the big boat Oh Oh oh it’s gonna be alright yeah yeah how
    can you tell yeah yeah I feel it in my heart it’s gonna be okay yeah yeah the
    sun is shining bright to another day it’s gonna be alright it’s gonna be okay if at first you don’t succeed you better
    try try again Hey clenched fists can’t plan to see you
    just open up your hand it’s gonna be alright it’s gonna be okay my heart’s gonna you’re gonna find your way it’s very hard to let things go
    tired to carry on you won’t know you’ve got to let it go as always thanks for watching please
    give us a like subscribe and ring the bell for notifications of every video we
    put out which is every Friday until next week
    Cheers in you wonder how even made

    SailAway 80 | Family Of Four Living On A 46′ Sailboat – A Day In The Life | Sailing Around The World
    Articles, Blog

    SailAway 80 | Family Of Four Living On A 46′ Sailboat – A Day In The Life | Sailing Around The World

    November 21, 2019


    this is our first-ever goddamn life and
    that’s it do you wanna sail away I wanna say where
    do you wanna say with me we’re gonna eat some toast and
    the things away and white kids those go sailing last time on a sail away a
    little leisure sail turned into a jammed mainsail but just another bug to work
    out before we leave for the Caribbean this week we thought we’d give you an
    idea of what one whole day is like living aboard a sailboat while getting
    ready to cruise the Caribbean while working and raising a three-year-old chapter one
    so who’s looking down their self with a little throw of the morning commuters
    for your dark reddish brown hair is a fake village with a bright white ribbon
    I didn’t suppose what are you doing if I need mommy hey come here
    should I come say good morning to Daddy all right I guess I guess it’s breakfast
    time do you want some eggs with cheese yeah I want to make coffee first stuff dog yoga yoga
    fuck that’s fine that’s the boiling you got something on
    your back okay let’s do this dog you were
    by the water I was on the line wish that I was right
    Oh I’m missing you so are you a cheese apple juice nectar of the gods Oh you’re a good yoga buddy
    so everything ready this is our first ever Dan life and that’s a little bit
    comical we made lunch what happened in one tank I’ll go fix it
    therefore we take Hey all right so as you saw learn how to
    bail me out and switch over our tanks so we have five tanks on board totaling
    about two hundred gallons and that consists of forward tank which is 60
    something of 6566 the two tanks on the side over here and over here these two
    are about sixty six these two are got sixty six so it all comes up to about
    two hundred there’s three fills one here one back there for those two pumps and
    one back there for these two see you guys they are off – what don’t
    library plus a quiet book to work in just kind of how we do it on the days
    that I work Lauren goes and finds ways to entertain rivers so that I can have a
    quiet boat so I try to maximize my time as much as I can while she’s going frankly my job is easier a walk what just nice get the kid out watch himself and now Georgia in the
    summer constantly you have to harbor raining you guys are back do you guys
    want for lunch apple juice that’s weird you what apple
    juice that’s first time you’ve ever asked for apple juice in the last minute what do you say yep
    angle angle angle all right now that’s close gosh there
    you go doing laundry it’s raining now oh wait
    just kidding Rayne has foiled laundry plans for a
    little bit super super nice and when it’s thundering rain and hard and I
    can’t work either I can actually put up with a decent amount of rain fresh rain
    an art it’s too loud might be both be out of commission for a little bit here
    that’s just how it goes this is what happens when you get stuck
    inside after lunch because it rains it’s mommy make it sound so good since
    when are you shy at camera oh of course it just looks like any into the water
    now right now really a new diet don’t heard me say that I was gonna take it
    for a walk so we’re gonna go do that way you want to go run how fast do you think
    you can run can you run as fast as the dog your
    walkie-talkies do you want to leave one for mommy oh that’s for me okay and then
    you’ll talk to me right let’s continue walking her dog oh yes that makes a lot of sense very
    good idea okay here we go first try right okay so I can try it right all
    right third try for sure probably fourth try one okay I’m really getting close
    fifth try all right probably six all right maybe
    seven I’m feeling seven eight is the one for sure okay
    definitely nine and no more the tenth obviously ten obviously it’s gonna be
    ten is nice even number okay it’s not ten so probably eleven we think I think it’s the camera in my hand is
    throwing me off oh that was really close yeah we’ve been really cool if I just
    nailed it wasn’t it I’m actually usually pretty good at this yes finally I didn’t you go see mommy
    see how dinner’s coming sharp use your new trick they’re hurt you have no feeling in your
    nose night dinner’s done mommy made such as it appeal hungry thank you to mommy he’s incensed
    by the fact that even cheers without a drink thank you for cooking so somebody’s a little crazy hi okay
    these rivers – hey the clock back say good night
    all right good night good night keep her fingers crossed on this one
    this is about an hour before he usually goes to bed he’s nuts today and I think
    he’s kind of like just grasping on to being awake right now one downside to living on a boat no
    dishwasher it’s not in this movie face one complete so I thought one of the more amusing
    things about this video is probably going to be people seeing how hard it is
    for us to get our child to go to that just happens and it just happened so we
    could relatively early pants drink yeah you stir it
    nope today that was pretty doable end up
    doing laundry which is very normal to me so we just wanted to do this first as a
    marina of the day in a light marina we use the word mean course on the United
    States and hopefully we can kind of do this every place we get to so you can
    see how different my side I won’t let that puts different now Georgia has been
    good and this marina has been great but we’re ready to be out of here in these
    someplace tropical well anyway we don’t watching able to do
    these little day in life we hope you enjoyed it this is to start version and
    I’m sure of change as our lives progressed there are some similarities
    to make the whole wife for sure probably before them maybe think there’s just
    other stuff you just gotta get used to feeling we hope you liked it you know I
    mean I’m one of the most exciting video so you’ve never seen so cheers to you
    for watching thank you and as always please subscribe bring a little dinghy
    Belle and if you are into all this and you want to help us out good please go
    check out our patreon page and visitor become a member of our group thank you
    so much see you next time that fat as you look through season five coming
    on and you wonder how we made it this far as you look through seasons that
    coming in you wonder how he made it this far

    ARE SAILING CHANNELS SELLING OUT? SAILBOAT LIVING! Q&A 16
    Articles, Blog

    ARE SAILING CHANNELS SELLING OUT? SAILBOAT LIVING! Q&A 16

    November 20, 2019


    Hello and welcome to Q&As. These are
    little QAs that are going to go alongside our normal weekly Thursday vlogs and
    they are the opportunity for you to ask us questions and for asked to try and
    give you some answers. So if you’ve got any comments or questions or opinions
    put them down below in the comment section and we’ll see what we can do.
    Let’s get into it and here’s the question…
    Matt Chuckle-oh or ChuckNote… I’m really sorry Matt I don’t know how
    to pronounce your surname but anyway Matt asked this a few days ago…
    Hi guys, probably a little contentious but as a long-term live-aboard and a
    long-term follower of sailing vlogs on YouTube do you think that the corporates
    are starting to exert their financial power a little too much? Sponsoring and
    Patreon are fair enough but I noticed a couple of vlogs are receiving many
    thousands of dollars per video and apparent sweetheart deals (you know who they are). It all seems to be getting away from the original intent of the cruising
    lifestyle. What are your thoughts. So thank you for raising a contentious
    question Matt and thank you very much indeed for becoming a Patreon, that’s
    fantastic and welcome aboard! I guess what we should really do is look at what
    what does it mean what is the cruising lifestyle, what is the original intent of
    the cruising lifestyle? But before we do that I think we should also look at why
    people vlog at all when they’re on boats, starting with us because that’s what I
    know about best. Why we’re here right now. When Jamie was a boy he started
    writing diaries and throughout his life he’s recorded what he’s done in some
    format or another. When I first met him in the Caribbean he’d been sailing all
    over Europe and he’d just crossed the Atlantic. And while he was doing that he
    set off a blog to keep his family and his friends abreast of everything that
    he was experiencing, with lots of photos and lots of stories about what he was
    seeing. Then when we were in Turkey he ramped up to a full-blown website and I
    started to help him a little bit with some of the storytelling. The next thing
    we did was we moved from Turkey to India, and for that particular adventure we
    added not only to the website we added podcasts. So we were podcasting and
    recording hopefully as much as possible on a daily basis what we were
    experiencing on that very long arduous and exciting journey. Once in India we both
    began to take the storytelling a stage further. Jaime concentrated on images and I concentrated on writing. Then finally when we got to Thailand and we
    started the refit, we decided that we needed to keep a video diary of
    everything that we were doing, because it was so enormous we felt it was a good
    way of actually keeping track of everything. So we started to release a
    weekly video on YouTube of the refit. It was towards the end of that a friend of
    ours, Behan from Sailing Totem said you know your videos are getting lots of
    hits, have you thought about getting them sponsored or getting some kind of
    recognition from your viewers. She told us about SV Delos and what they
    were doing on Patreon. well we looked at what they were doing and we realized we
    had this huge backlog of videos and we were receiving all kinds of comments
    from people saying they would like to donate something to help us. So we
    thought gotta do it, it’s a bit of a no-brainer to be honest with you. So why
    do other cruisers vlog? Well over the last couple of years we’ve seen a really
    huge explosion in sailing vlogs all over YouTube. I suspect that some of them are
    doing this because they’ve seen people like La Vagabonde and Delos and other
    channels doing really well through sponsorship and through Patreon. And I
    also suspect that they’re doing this because they think that they may be able
    to grab some of the action and help it fund their lifestyle. While Jamie and I
    are on Patreon we don’t actually use it to fund our lifestyle (we’ve done that
    through renting out our flat in London and living off the income since 2005). For
    us Patreon is a way of allowing us to have a little bit more cash, a bit of pin
    money to buy really good camera equipment, new laptops to pay for the
    enormous amount of Wi-Fi it costs and internet connection, loads of other bits
    and pieces. All of that is to help us make much better videos. I think if
    you go right back to the beginning and you look at what we were doing to what
    we’re doing now I really hope that you will see there has been some improvement! But if unlike us you have no regular income, you’ve still got to find a way of
    funding the lifestyle. We know people who do all kinds of things. Some of them flip burgers and work in restaurants, some use their sailing
    skills to teach or to deliver boats, and some try the vlogging way. But is there
    really any difference between flipping a burger, teaching sailing or putting out a
    sailing channel? They’re all trying to do the same thing aren’t they? And do we
    think that corporate sponsorship actually compromises your liveaboard or
    cruising lifestyle? I’m not really sure about that, because I think that if
    you’ve got some really fabulous deal it might actually make your cruising
    lifestyle even better. So maybe it’s not the cruising lifestyle that’s being
    compromised, but maybe it’s the sailing vlog that’s being compromised by these
    “corporates”. If all of a sudden you’re having to behave in a certain way, or do
    certain things, or go to a certain place… and the viewers find that that is not
    real, and the viewers feel irritated or even shortchanged by what they’re now
    seeing… then maybe we have got a problem? And maybe there is a compromise there? I don’t know. It’s just a suggestion. I’d like to know what people think about
    that. Jamie and I have always seen recording our lifestyle in all its
    adventure and often banality as a hobby. It is something that we do and that we
    love doing. The moment it becomes a chore, and the moment somebody starts telling
    us what to do, I think we would give it up. But. as the Godfather himself says,
    sometimes you just might receive “an offer you can’t refuse!”
    Do let us have your opinions in the comments below, let’s get a debate going.
    I’d really like to know what everybody thinks about our vlog, other vlogs, and
    whether any of us are being compromised by corporate or any kind of sponsorship.
    I think it’s a really interesting one, it’s something we would like to know
    your opinions on. So that’s it for now Peace and fair winds!

    SailAway 54 | Angry Storms on the Intracoastal Waterway | Sailboat Living Sailing Vlog
    Articles, Blog

    SailAway 54 | Angry Storms on the Intracoastal Waterway | Sailboat Living Sailing Vlog

    November 17, 2019


    do you wanna say with me last week Bowen
    brandy from Saline Saoirse joined us for a regatta in Fort Pierce that was not to
    be so we decided live to race another day that sucks oh we got a baby we got
    to go back sorry keep someone out foul like lazy boat morning
    I mean absolute lazy really since gotta put it off it’s gonna be gross sale
    today cup of weird weekend’s we met Lo and
    brandy got to show them what it’s like to abandon race that’s always fun here but bump it eat a meal and we’re in it and then you
    spit it out this barrier well we’ve got a dreary day today sail
    back to Stuart so I’m gonna shower be civilized in it it’s no real rush and
    they’ve got nice showers here so nice we take advantage we’re on the far side of
    Marina look over there tarp things vane first
    marina in background that’s the main part particle I dot over here is kind of
    mine so bathroom and shower building right here so we’re kind of separated
    away from everything that actually really close case you’ve never done
    marina facilities this is for a huge budget a look like yeah it’s pretty nice this is the shower
    room two three showers hopped in morning itself before doing a video monologue in
    a restroom boys check I thought that place was
    empty that means that I just did right before I hopped in the shower outside
    the yeah use the John first yeah sure it up there’s a pair of feet right there in
    front of me so stealth mode or something probably just thinking bantams you’re
    trying to take it dump and suddenly I’m part of a tour so I just kind of finally
    slipped out and then he quietly slipped out wasn’t awkward at all
    yeah sure this way all right well here’s my quick review of the collapsible hose
    they suck don’t buy one for those of you who wonder why we sometimes have a leash
    on her baby it’s cost the author walks like a drunk so pretty today biggest sale there was a pretty stiff wind on our
    Stern quarter holding us against the dock so it took some coordinated shoving
    and motoring just to get away from it I no longer be myself will I ever see the
    Sun but I no longer hold account I have
    nowhere downside and the answer to your well but any dock
    maneuver that doesn’t break the boat or somebody is a success your hearts
    I am only Sundaram I am always owned around Frankie whether
    we got right now we’ve been it up was never great yeah
    good times yeah we got our Dodger enclosure put up so that a little bit of
    protection up there at least but we knew it’s going to be like this all day angry icw cease right now breaks me out
    man I don’t like it cry-baby call me when
    light shines forgive me everything laughter give me everything I’ve down enough to complain I hope you
    the same you baby gave me
    do you don’t miss stay down below so that I don’t know the
    craziness is going on right now like we gotta leave because of the angle and strength of the
    wind it changed the turning spot I needed to hit to back the boat into the
    slip never force it if you’ve got room to
    back out and try it again as always thanks for watching please
    like and subscribe and ring the bell if you’d like a notification for each new
    video Cheers yes

    Articles

    Waterspout, lightning, squall, running aground + how we hoist the dinghy – Sailing Ep 172

    November 14, 2019


    From 1,500 rpm we’re doing just over 1
    knot. That’s a waterspout, and that’s right above the anchorage we’re trying
    to get to. It was a really close call, the closest I think we’ve ever come to
    running aground. This is what you call wind against current against tide
    against fetch. We just came through this channel. We were hitting 7 knots so there
    was obviously current pushing us through but of course we were battling through all the waves
    that have built up over the hundreds of miles in the Java Sea coming the other way.
    Meanwhile the wind is coming this way and it’s very shallow. And this is the result.
    And this is when you want to make sure your engine is in good order.
    It’s times like this when I sh1t myself Can’t get over how beautiful it is
    around here. I think it helps that it’s a lovely day with blue skies and little
    fluffy clouds adds to the atmosphere but so much greenery around us and there’s
    some big mountains as well. This area kind of reminds me of Turkey a bit it’s
    a big open area with lots of little islands and a great big playground for
    sailors because with the South easterlies which are consistently
    coming through, certainly at the bottom end, a great place to hang out. The only
    difference is of course that it’s much more shallow here than it is in Turkey,
    so you’ve got rocks and reefs to contend with. Anyway we’ve now got to the top of
    Lingga island and we just would poke our nose in over the top. There’s a couple of
    tiny little channels that we may be able to get into. Difficult to tell, only a
    hundred meters wide. Might bottle it when we go and eye them up. But if not then
    looks like there’s a nice little anchorage just at the top. It just gives
    us a little bit of protection should the weather come in. And a nice easy exit for
    when we leave tomorrow. We got through the channel not very pleasant, but
    fine. The current took us through. We’re now out of the worst of that wind, and we’re
    looking for somewhere where we can put the sail up. It was far too windy there.
    So we’re going to be going through a channel once again. Navionics, of course,
    isn’t quite right so we’re using Offline Maps as well. And we’re hoping when we
    get into that channel we should be really well secluded and find a good
    spot just to drop the anchor and get the sail back up. A little bit disconcerting
    just came in and put the boat in to tickover and we were doing six and a half
    knots. In tickover. So rather than just dump the hook I thought I’d just check to
    see what it’s like if I turn the boat around. So I’m now aiming to go back out following our track in. From 1,500 rpm
    we’re doing just over one knot. So it just makes me a little bit nervous about
    dropping the hook anywhere around here. It might just be this particular spot
    here. But I think what we’ll do is we’ll go back out and we’ll check out
    along the coastline which again is fairly protected, but it seems like
    there’s a very very strong current here, which we had been warned about. So this might put it in perspective. As you look down… Look at that, it looks like we’re
    making good progress. But if I bring it up and you use a transit on that back
    stay there, the green line with the sandy patch behind, and look how slowly it’s
    passing it. Barely bloody moving at all. And as you
    can see over there, I’ll zoom in, you can see those over overfalls or current. This is really quite vicious. And a little bit scary. As you can see
    (I don’t know if you can see) that it’s all quite close. Little bay there and there’s
    one channel through there. There’s two channels through there. And then there’s
    this little bay here, which is where I thought perhaps we could anchor but I
    don’t really want to be anchoring in six knots of current. Just whilst we’re killing some time
    I just thought I’d show you a little tip when you hoist your dinghy up. And it’s
    something that I’ve only just started doing. Thanks to Ian on Icey Red
    who recommended this. Now normally when we hoist the
    dinghy we leave it hanging using the blocks that actually hoist it. Now we tie
    off lines across like this to stop it from moving backwards and forwards. But
    it still had a tendency to move slightly Plus of course it puts a lot of strain
    and weight on that block system. A couple of weeks ago one of them gave way
    and the dinghy dropped in the water at 3:00 in the morning, which is not ideal.
    But let me just show you this. To be honest I’ve no idea why I didn’t do this
    before and I’m sure some of you out there probably saying well you’re an
    idiot, this is the obvious way to do it. But you can see I’ve taken that Dyneema
    line, you can just see that black line there. So it goes over the davit and it
    goes down to the same clip as the block system. Now that’s where I’ve
    currently tied it off, but really that should be some kind of carabiner or
    something that I can easily clip and unclip. And of course we’ve got the two
    Dyneema lines which run across like so to there. And, by the way, in case you may
    have noticed, this happened. When we were in Sabang – I didn’t mention this
    at the time because I didn’t want to upset anyone – but when were in Sabang
    we tied the dinghy up and left it for a day on a Sunday. When we came back there were about 30 kids who had basically – I don’t know what they’ve done actually – they had played
    around with everything. They had ripped various fittings. They ripped this off.
    They were playing around with the outboard, it was in a funny position… blah
    blah blah… I went to see the Harbormaster but no-one seemed to want
    to take any responsibility for it. It’s just one of those things…
    Sunday afternoon all the kids are out playing, so it’s an obvious thing for them to play with.
    But, yeah, a little bit angry about that. So that explains the state
    of our dinghy. The other thing I’ve done as well is to tie underneath another
    line. Now this one runs to the wheels on the dinghy and that helps give it a bit
    more stability. And then quite often I will take the painter under here and tie
    that off as well. Since doing this the dinghy has
    remained very steady. And bear in mind for the last two days we’ve been in some pretty
    rolly seas. So very happy with that set-up. Bit of a hectic start this morning. The
    wind picked up throughout the night and, as you can see, the swell picked up as
    well. So trying to weigh anchor was quite interesting because the wind was pushing
    us one way in the current the other. But we did it. So now we’re just cutting across,
    which means going into wind, which we haven’t done for a long while.
    So we have to cut across this bay and then we start going down It’ll be interesting
    to see what the current does because I think the tide will be turning soon and
    we’ll have the current with us. It’s quite a tricky passage today. A few
    narrow entrances and obviously the usual rocks and reefs,
    so let’s see how we get on… In case you’re wondering what the hell’s
    going on we’re trying to get through this little channel. It’s 0.2 miles wide
    and lots of overfalls everywhere, including in the channel. So it’s a
    little bit rolly. Speed’s down to 2.6kts. The real troublesome thing here is
    that the boat naturally wants to get pulled to starboard, which pulls us
    into the island just there. It’s that close. The autopilot is on fast. It’s on quick
    setting, so it’s compensating the other way. Problem is that when it does that
    it then shoots over to the other side, so it pulls it all the way over to
    starboard again, in fact we go towards the island. And this is all happening at 1.7knts Some pretty hardcore overfalls
    actually, I don’t think I’ve been in anything quite as as tough as this.
    They’re having a big effect on the steering. It’s exciting, but it’s also
    scary. It seems as if we’re past the worst of it.
    But actually our speed has now dropped right down to half a knot… …at 1500 rpm. So we are now going past this island
    where there’s a shallow patch very very slowly.
    It’s like everything is in slow motion. Local fishing by over there probably
    looking at us going “what the — are they doing?” Because there is actually a back channel,
    but we’re not sure that we can get the boat through. Unsure of the draft. But
    that’s obviously the place that these guys go through.
    Much easier. 1.2 kts now. Don’t know how well you can see that…
    That’s a waterspout and that’s right above the anchorage
    we’re trying to get to… Lightning now as well. So we’ve got waterspout, lightning, black cloud… And that’s where we’re supposed to be anchoring. And I would rather lurk around out here before we go in. That’s two anchorages in three days that we’ve
    approached with a squall. Don’t know if you could hear what Liz was saying but
    there was a water spout in among all that lot. [And lightning]. Sort of above where we’re
    supposed to be anchoring – but actually if you look at the weather, the radar,
    you can see the cloud is somewhat behind it. Don’t know what to do… Well that really was one of the
    strangest sails we’ve ever done I think. Very interesting, but very frustrating.
    These currents get really really strong. And as you saw when we went through that
    little cut, we got down to half a knot. But that’s where the adventure only just
    began because shortly after that – the bit that you missed, that we didn’t record
    because we didn’t know it was happening till the very last moment – was when we
    almost ran aground. Now on the charts, just to the east of an island, is where the depth dropped from 20m to 10m. But, in fact, there’s a reef there.
    Now the problem was is that we were using our phones to look at the
    satellite imagery but for some reason mine didn’t show anything. Turns out I
    had to reset my phone for the sat image to reload. Very strange. Anyway, it was an
    horrendous experience because as we were approaching it we could see eddies –
    there were eddies everywhere (overfalls) but these were particularly strong and
    as we got to it I was thinking “well I know the depth gets shallow here.
    But 10m, 9m, 8m, 7m, 6m, 5m…” At that point of course
    put the boat into astern. The lowest depth I saw on our depth sounder was 1.7.
    When it hits 1.4 that’s when we hit bottom. Bear in mind of course with all these overfalls we’re moving like this as
    well. It was a really close call, the closest I think we’ve ever come to
    running aground. So that put the willies up us. So we went to back out.
    Then we tried to get out of this area. When we reloaded our phones to find the true
    satellite imagery, well it was littered with reefs. So to get out of that we had
    to go back on ourselves. And then, of course, the current picked up because we
    were coming out of these islands. You can imagine all these hundreds of islands.
    The amount of currents and eddies and overfalls that it creates is quite
    phenomenal. So yeah, it was a bit frustrating. It wasn’t literally
    until the last hour or two that we could actually pick up a bit of speed. And then,
    of course, as we came into this anchorage, as you saw from that footage, big
    westerly squall came through. There was a waterspout, lightning. [Laughs] Really bizarre. We only did 35 miles today, it feels like 200. It makes for an interesting
    passage I suppose. But it was just a little bit, I think ‘frustrating’ is the word.
    But hey, look at this place. We’re anchored by a little village on an island that
    doesn’t even have a name. How weird is that? But it seems pretty secluded this
    is a recommendation from a Facebook friend, Mark Bongers. Thank you, Mark. This
    looks like a pretty safe place to just rest for the night. Tomorrow, early
    start, hit those currents. And it’s the last stop before we hit Malaysia.

    Full Time Liveaboard Boat Life: Shredding a Sail while Sailing in France
    Articles, Blog

    Full Time Liveaboard Boat Life: Shredding a Sail while Sailing in France

    November 14, 2019


    When did we get here? Two days ago? The sail over here two and a half days ago we were sailing along, all the things were
    great, life was good, and then we saw some dolphins and we thought, “Hey, that’s great. Good omen, dolphins” and then literally as soon as the Sun set and the Dolphins
    said goodbye our davits broke. What just happened? And then within 20 minutes we had a dinghy that was upside down in the water
    and no outboard motor. Um, yeah. All of our plans were now halted. Priority number one was to find an outboard engine. We arrived on a S unday so we had a picnic and we went to see a flick at the world’s oldest cinema. Also, while we were in La Ciotat we need to find a welder to reattach and reinforce the davits to the transom. Being in our first time in
    France and except for pleasantries none of us speak French, Lise & Eric from Bon Fond, we’re very gracious and helped us find a welder so we met up with Julien and we attempted to communicate some sort of solution. We visited a few different places looking for an outboard motor and there was none to be found. One guy even told us that there are no outboard motors within the area that
    were being sold and that instead we would have to buy a new one and that it would
    take two weeks, but right next door we found a store that was selling a
    refurbished 9.9 Yamaha outboard motor and that was actually the only one being
    sold within a 20-mile radius. Wow, that sounds so much better. Way quieter. And there they go. What happened? It stopped running. But it was going so well! Going over there to talk to the guy. Apparently in France gazole is not
    petrol. It’s diesel. SP 95 is petrol. I put diesel in a petrol engine. Understandably we had some miscommunications with Julien and after a week of trying to
    dissolve a solution and us needing to be on our way we just straight-up bolted
    the davits to the transom. Only having 14 days left to exit the EU without violating the Schengen Agreement we had almost 1,000 nautical miles to Albania.
    1000 miles is near 10 days on the water. We had a smooth sail to Corsica where we stopped for a day to film with Thibault and Jelena. We sailed in the Gulf di Talabo and then sailed down around Le Bocche and across all the way,
    there’s Roma, that’s where we are now. We beat windward to exit the bay and headed south. As we rounded the island beginning to
    pass through the Strait of Bonifacio we read both pages with pretty much a
    straight shot to Rome. The plan was that I was gonna man the
    helm until around 2 a.m. Just as the forecast had suggested, as the Sun was
    beginning to set, off to the north east about 15 miles I could see rain clouds
    developing, but I thought if those rain clouds develop into a storm the wind is
    coming out of the due west so the storm should stay to the north of us. But just
    around midnight as I was watching the storm grow and it began to move south right in our path the decision was made that we were to turn around and head back for
    Sardinia. We don’t actually have any footage of this because it was all hands on deck, midnight and hectic so this will stand in as Arianrhod. With the wind blowing a 6 on the Buford
    wind scale we had to remove sail so we could head back to Sardinia. We were able to furl in the jib with ease. Though Sardinia lay off to our
    starboard quarter, we turned on the engine and turned to port to spill the wind from
    the Genoa so that we can disconnect the whisker pole and furl it in. It took
    all my effort to disconnect the whisker pole and in the process the Genoa was
    luffing aggressively. Beating against the pole the Genoa tore like it was
    confetti. With the whisker pole finally stored, I crawled to the bow and furled
    in the Genoa by hand. The bow was heaving at the crest and crashing into the
    troughs and I bear hugged the sail to stay on the boat as I made incremental
    progress. After three hours of motoring and a total of 15 hours on the water, we
    finally dropped anchor and rested for a few hours. Midday we decided to head for open water and finish our sail to Rome. Upon arrival in Italy we tried to lower
    the obliterated sail, but it was just too windy so we secured it the best that we could because we only had a single day to visit Rome. Decimated head sail. The boat looks fantastic right now. Subscribe.